Inhibition of p21 activated kinase (PAK) reduces airway responsiveness in vivo and in vitro in murine and human airways

Wyn C. Hoover, Wenwu Zhang, Zhidong Xue, Huanling Gao, Jonathan Chernoff, D. Wade Clapp, Susan J. Gunst, Robert S. Tepper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The p21-activated protein kinases (Paks) have been implicated in the regulation of smooth muscle contractility, but the physiologic effects of Pak activation on airway reactivity in vivo are unknown. A mouse model with a genetic deletion of Pak1 (Pak1-/-) was used to determine the role of Pak in the response of the airways in vivo to challenge with inhaled or intravenous acetylcholine (ACh). Pulmonary resistance was measured in anesthetized mechanically ventilated Pak1-/- and wild type mice. Pak1-/- mice exhibited lower airway reactivity to ACh compared with wild type mice. Tracheal segments dissected from Pak1-/- mice and studied in vitro also exhibited reduced responsiveness to ACh compared with tracheas from wild type mice. Morphometric assessment and pulmonary function analysis revealed no differences in the structure of the airways or lung parenchyma, suggesting that that the reduced airway responsiveness did not result from structural abnormalities in the lungs or airways due to Pak1 deletion. Inhalation of the small molecule synthetic Pak1 inhibitor, IPA3, also significantly reduced in vivo airway responsiveness to ACh and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-Ht) in wild type mice. IPA3 inhibited the contractility of isolated human bronchial tissues to ACh, confirming that this inhibitor is also effective in human airway smooth muscle tissue. The results demonstrate that Pak is a critical component of the contractile activation process in airway smooth muscle, and suggest that Pak inhibition could provide a novel strategy for reducing airway hyperresponsiveness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere42601
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume7
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 10 2012

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p21-Activated Kinases
acetylcholine
phosphotransferases (kinases)
Acetylcholine
mice
smooth muscle
Smooth Muscle
lungs
Lung
Muscle
muscle strength
trachea (vertebrates)
lung function
muscle tissues
serotonin
protein kinases
Chemical activation
breathing
In Vitro Techniques
Trachea

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Cite this

Inhibition of p21 activated kinase (PAK) reduces airway responsiveness in vivo and in vitro in murine and human airways. / Hoover, Wyn C.; Zhang, Wenwu; Xue, Zhidong; Gao, Huanling; Chernoff, Jonathan; Clapp, D. Wade; Gunst, Susan J.; Tepper, Robert S.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 7, No. 8, e42601, 10.08.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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