Initial mechanical stability of cementless highly-porous titanium tibial components

Luke Amer, T. Brandon Stone, Christopher P. Warren, Phillip Cornwell, R. Meneghini

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Cementless fixation in total knee replacement has seen limited use since reports of early failure surfaced in the late 1980s and early 1990s. However, the emergence of improved biomaterials, particularly porous titanium and tantalum, has led to a renewed interest in developing a cementless tibial component to enhance long-term survivorship of the implants. Cement is commonly used to mechanically fix orthopaedic implants, but represents a weak interface between the implant and the bone. The elimination of cement and application of these new biomaterials, which theoretically provide improved stability and ultimate osseointegration, would likely result in greater knee replacement success. Additionally, the removal of the cement from this procedure would eliminate the time needed for curing, thereby minimizing surgical durations and decreasing the risk of infection. The purpose of this biomechanical study was twofold. The first goal was to assess whether vibration analysis techniques can be used to evaluate and characterize initial mechanical stability of cementless implants more accurately than the traditional method of micromotion determination, which employs linear variable differential transducers (LVDTs). The second goal was to perform an evaluative study to determine the comparative mechanical stability of five designs of cementless tibial components under mechanical loading designed to simulate in vivo forces. The test groups included a cemented Triathlon Keeled baseplate control group, three different 2-peg cementless baseplates with smooth-, mid-, and high- roughness, and a 4-peg cementless baseplate with mid-roughness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationConference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event27th Conference and Exposition on Structural Dynamics 2009, IMAC XXVII - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: Feb 9 2009Feb 12 2009

Other

Other27th Conference and Exposition on Structural Dynamics 2009, IMAC XXVII
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period2/9/092/12/09

Fingerprint

Knee prostheses
Bone cement
Mechanical stability
Biomaterials
Titanium
Surface roughness
Orthopedics
Tantalum
Vibration analysis
Curing
Transducers
Bone
Cements

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Computational Mechanics
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Amer, L., Stone, T. B., Warren, C. P., Cornwell, P., & Meneghini, R. (2009). Initial mechanical stability of cementless highly-porous titanium tibial components. In Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series

Initial mechanical stability of cementless highly-porous titanium tibial components. / Amer, Luke; Stone, T. Brandon; Warren, Christopher P.; Cornwell, Phillip; Meneghini, R.

Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series. 2009.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Amer, L, Stone, TB, Warren, CP, Cornwell, P & Meneghini, R 2009, Initial mechanical stability of cementless highly-porous titanium tibial components. in Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series. 27th Conference and Exposition on Structural Dynamics 2009, IMAC XXVII, Orlando, FL, United States, 2/9/09.
Amer L, Stone TB, Warren CP, Cornwell P, Meneghini R. Initial mechanical stability of cementless highly-porous titanium tibial components. In Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series. 2009
Amer, Luke ; Stone, T. Brandon ; Warren, Christopher P. ; Cornwell, Phillip ; Meneghini, R. / Initial mechanical stability of cementless highly-porous titanium tibial components. Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series. 2009.
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