Initial ventilation strategies during newborn resuscitation

Benjamin J. Stenson, David Boyle, Edgardo G. Szyld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ventilation alone is usually effective in most neonatal resuscitation episodes. A review of the evidence underpinning recommendations for methods and devices for providing initial ventilation during newborn resuscitation was conducted. Self-inflating bags, flow-inflating (anesthesia) bags, and T-piece devices all may be used to provide effective ventilation after birth, with none clearly superior. Whichever method is used, ventilation is likely to be delivered more consistently if a pressure-monitoring device is incorporated. The best indication of successful ventilation is a prompt increase in heart rate. The role of positive end-expiratory pressure during resuscitation requires further research, particularly in preterm infants, in whom it may protect against lung injury.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-82
Number of pages18
JournalClinics in Perinatology
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2006

Fingerprint

Resuscitation
Ventilation
Newborn Infant
Equipment and Supplies
Positive-Pressure Respiration
Lung Injury
Premature Infants
Anesthesia
Heart Rate
Parturition
Pressure
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Initial ventilation strategies during newborn resuscitation. / Stenson, Benjamin J.; Boyle, David; Szyld, Edgardo G.

In: Clinics in Perinatology, Vol. 33, No. 1, 03.2006, p. 65-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stenson, Benjamin J. ; Boyle, David ; Szyld, Edgardo G. / Initial ventilation strategies during newborn resuscitation. In: Clinics in Perinatology. 2006 ; Vol. 33, No. 1. pp. 65-82.
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