Innovation in care for individuals with cognitive impairment: Can reimbursement policy spread best practices?

Soo Borson, Joshua Chodosh, Cyndy Cordell, Beth Kallmyer, Malaz Boustani, Anna Chodos, Jatin K. Dave, Lisa Gwyther, Susan Reed, David B. Reuben, Stephen Stabile, Monica Willis-Parker, William Thies

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is now an unprecedented opportunity to improve the care of the over 5 million people who are living with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias and many more with cognitive impairment due to brain injury, systemic diseases, and other causes. The introduction of a new Medicare care planning benefit—long sought openly by advocacy organizations and clinicians and badly needed by patients and families—could greatly improve health care quality, but only if widely and fully implemented. We describe the components of this new benefit and its promise of better clinical care, as well as its potential to create a new platform for clinical and health outcomes research. We highlight external factors—and some that are internal to the benefit structure itself—that challenge the full realization of its value, and we call for broad public and professional engagement to ensure that it will not fail.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1168-1173
Number of pages6
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
Volume13
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

Fingerprint

Quality of Health Care
Medicare
Practice Guidelines
Brain Injuries
Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Organizations
Health
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • Barriers
  • Care planning dementia
  • Implementation
  • Practice tools
  • Primary care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Innovation in care for individuals with cognitive impairment : Can reimbursement policy spread best practices? / Borson, Soo; Chodosh, Joshua; Cordell, Cyndy; Kallmyer, Beth; Boustani, Malaz; Chodos, Anna; Dave, Jatin K.; Gwyther, Lisa; Reed, Susan; Reuben, David B.; Stabile, Stephen; Willis-Parker, Monica; Thies, William.

In: Alzheimer's and Dementia, Vol. 13, No. 10, 01.10.2017, p. 1168-1173.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

Borson, S, Chodosh, J, Cordell, C, Kallmyer, B, Boustani, M, Chodos, A, Dave, JK, Gwyther, L, Reed, S, Reuben, DB, Stabile, S, Willis-Parker, M & Thies, W 2017, 'Innovation in care for individuals with cognitive impairment: Can reimbursement policy spread best practices?', Alzheimer's and Dementia, vol. 13, no. 10, pp. 1168-1173. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2017.09.001
Borson, Soo ; Chodosh, Joshua ; Cordell, Cyndy ; Kallmyer, Beth ; Boustani, Malaz ; Chodos, Anna ; Dave, Jatin K. ; Gwyther, Lisa ; Reed, Susan ; Reuben, David B. ; Stabile, Stephen ; Willis-Parker, Monica ; Thies, William. / Innovation in care for individuals with cognitive impairment : Can reimbursement policy spread best practices?. In: Alzheimer's and Dementia. 2017 ; Vol. 13, No. 10. pp. 1168-1173.
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