Innovations in the Treatment of Invasive Cervical Cancer

Frederick Stehman, Peter G. Rose, Benjamin E. Greer, Michel Roy, Marie Plante, Manuel Penalver, Anuja Jhingran, Patricia Eifel, Fredrick Montz, J. Taylor Wharton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Invasive cervical cancer is characterized by basement membrane-invading lesions capable of metastasizing through the lymphatic and vascular systems. Treatment methods were reviewed by panelists at the Second International Conference on Cervical Cancer (Houston, TX, April 11-14, 2002), and new opportunities for translational research were discussed. Reviews encompassed hysterectomy with or without lymph node dissection or cervical conization in cases with microinvasion and radical trachelectomy with or without lymph node dissection as fertility-sparing surgery. Chemoradiation is used to treat advanced cervical malignancies, and the risks and benefits of radiotherapy are significant. Pelvic exenteration is used to treat certain types of recurrences. Use of the Miami pouch for continent urinary diversion was highlighted. Gynecologic oncologists expect novel in vivo imaging techniques currently being developed to help guide therapy choices within the next decade. The most significant research priorities are large group-randomized trials involving fertility-sparing procedures and the management of microinvasive carcinoma (MICA); better identification of candidates for chemoradiation; and the development of innovative approaches to exenteration. Improving diagnostic technologies, refining the criteria by which therapies are chosen, and preserving fertility remain challenges in selecting the most appropriate treatment for invasive cervical cancer. Research advances in both diagnosis and treatment are expected to improve therapy and outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2052-2063
Number of pages12
JournalCancer
Volume98
Issue number9 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Nov 1 2003

Fingerprint

Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Fertility
Lymph Node Excision
Therapeutics
Pelvic Exenteration
Conization
Lymphatic System
Urinary Diversion
Translational Medical Research
Hysterectomy
Research
Basement Membrane
Blood Vessels
Radiotherapy
Technology
Carcinoma
Recurrence
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Stehman, F., Rose, P. G., Greer, B. E., Roy, M., Plante, M., Penalver, M., ... Wharton, J. T. (2003). Innovations in the Treatment of Invasive Cervical Cancer. Cancer, 98(9 SUPPL.), 2052-2063.

Innovations in the Treatment of Invasive Cervical Cancer. / Stehman, Frederick; Rose, Peter G.; Greer, Benjamin E.; Roy, Michel; Plante, Marie; Penalver, Manuel; Jhingran, Anuja; Eifel, Patricia; Montz, Fredrick; Wharton, J. Taylor.

In: Cancer, Vol. 98, No. 9 SUPPL., 01.11.2003, p. 2052-2063.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stehman, F, Rose, PG, Greer, BE, Roy, M, Plante, M, Penalver, M, Jhingran, A, Eifel, P, Montz, F & Wharton, JT 2003, 'Innovations in the Treatment of Invasive Cervical Cancer', Cancer, vol. 98, no. 9 SUPPL., pp. 2052-2063.
Stehman F, Rose PG, Greer BE, Roy M, Plante M, Penalver M et al. Innovations in the Treatment of Invasive Cervical Cancer. Cancer. 2003 Nov 1;98(9 SUPPL.):2052-2063.
Stehman, Frederick ; Rose, Peter G. ; Greer, Benjamin E. ; Roy, Michel ; Plante, Marie ; Penalver, Manuel ; Jhingran, Anuja ; Eifel, Patricia ; Montz, Fredrick ; Wharton, J. Taylor. / Innovations in the Treatment of Invasive Cervical Cancer. In: Cancer. 2003 ; Vol. 98, No. 9 SUPPL. pp. 2052-2063.
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