Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors. Probes for investigations of the functions of guanine nucleotide binding proteins in intact cells

Maria Teresa Rizzo, Guido Tricot, Ronald Hoffman, H. N. Jayarams, George Weber, Joe G N Garcia, Denis English

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Taken together, the above reports indicate that the IMP dehydrogenase inhibitors are valuable probes for investigation of the biological functions of guanine nucleotides in intact cells. While these agents have minor effects on levels of other nucleotides and enzymes, non-specific effects can be monitored by addition of guanine or guanosine to provide substrates for the salvage pathway of guanine nucleotide synthesis. The most important question yet to be resolved in employing these agents is why incomplete depletion of intracellular guanine nucleotides results in such dramatic effects on G-protein function. Since the level of GTP in resting cells is approximately 0.5 mM, even a 90% reduction in GTP levels should leave enough nucleotide to adequately activate most known G-proteins, as the latter display high binding affinities for guanine nucleotides in cell free systems. Several explanations have been proposed to account for this disparity. Much of the intracellular guanine nucleotide may be bound or compartmentalized and therefore unable to interact with certain G-proteins. Possibly, G-proteins in the intracellular environment possess a much lower affinity for GTP that they do in cell free system. It may be to the cells' advantage that relatively minor fluctuations in levels of GTP result in pronounced alterations in the biological function of G-proteins as this effect may provide a physiologically important mechanism for the regulation of G-proteins in vivo. Further studies are necessary to clarify the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the biological function of G-proteins and oncogene products by guanine nucleotides in intact cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)509-519
Number of pages11
JournalCellular Signalling
Volume2
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990

Fingerprint

Inosine Monophosphate
Guanine Nucleotides
GTP-Binding Proteins
Carrier Proteins
Oxidoreductases
Guanosine Triphosphate
Cell-Free System
Nucleotides
IMP Dehydrogenase
Guanosine
Oncogene Proteins
Guanine
Enzymes

Keywords

  • G-proteins
  • guanine nucleotides
  • inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors
  • signal-transduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors. Probes for investigations of the functions of guanine nucleotide binding proteins in intact cells. / Rizzo, Maria Teresa; Tricot, Guido; Hoffman, Ronald; Jayarams, H. N.; Weber, George; Garcia, Joe G N; English, Denis.

In: Cellular Signalling, Vol. 2, No. 6, 1990, p. 509-519.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rizzo, Maria Teresa ; Tricot, Guido ; Hoffman, Ronald ; Jayarams, H. N. ; Weber, George ; Garcia, Joe G N ; English, Denis. / Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors. Probes for investigations of the functions of guanine nucleotide binding proteins in intact cells. In: Cellular Signalling. 1990 ; Vol. 2, No. 6. pp. 509-519.
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