Insulin-like growth factor secretion by human B-lymphocytes

A comparison of cells from normal and pygmy subjects

T. J. Merimee, M. B. Grant, C. M. Broder, L. L. Cavalli-Sforza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Freshly isolated human B-lymphocytes from eight subjects and Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human B-lymphocytes from seven subjects were examined for their capacity to secrete insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-II and for their capacity to respond to human GH. Similar studies were conducted with Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes collected from six African pygmies. When transformed B-lymphocytes from normal stature subjects were cultured for 3 weeks in RPMI-1640 medium (6 x 103 cells/75-cm2 flask at seeding), significant amounts of IGF-I, but no IGF-II, were produced. GH (150 ng/mL) significant increased for control cells the amount of IGF-I produced at each sampling interval compared to that by unstimulated cultures (P <0.05 at 1 week; P = 0.005 at 3 weeks). At 3 weeks, cell counts of cultures compared were 4.13 ± 0.39 x 106/mL for unstimulated cells and 4.23 ± 0.87 x 106/mL for GH-stimulated cells. IGF-I production at this time interval by unstimulated cells was 2.8 ± 2.3 ng/mL, and that by GH-stimulated cells was 12.3 ± 2.5 ng/mL (P = 0.005). Cell multiplication rates of control cultures were increased in 1 week by GH stimulation [GH stimulated, [16.7 ± 22.0 x 104 cells, unstimulated, 5.73 ± 4.1 x 104 cells; (mean ± SD); n = 14; P <0.01]. Similar results occurred with GH studied at a lower concentration of 10 ng/mL for 3 weeks. Freshly isolated B-lymphocytes did not secrete IGF-I and -II after 5 days of culture with GH. Cultures established from cells derived from pygmies produced significantly less IGF-I (4.24 ± 2.62 ng/mL) when stimulated with 150 ng/mL GH than cultures of cells from normal stature subjects (12.3 ± 2.5 ng/mL; 0.005 <P <0.01). The cultures compared had a similar cell density. A similar significant difference in IGF-I secretion occurred between cultures of pygmy and control cells stimulated with 10 ng/mL GH. These data are consistent with previous in vivo studies in which pygmies failed to increase IGF-I and exhibit metabolic responses to exogenous GH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)978-984
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume69
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Lymphocytes
Somatomedins
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
B-Lymphocytes
Insulin-Like Growth Factor II
Cell Culture Techniques
Viruses
Human Herpesvirus 4
Cell Count
Sampling
Cell Proliferation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Insulin-like growth factor secretion by human B-lymphocytes : A comparison of cells from normal and pygmy subjects. / Merimee, T. J.; Grant, M. B.; Broder, C. M.; Cavalli-Sforza, L. L.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 69, No. 5, 1989, p. 978-984.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Merimee, T. J. ; Grant, M. B. ; Broder, C. M. ; Cavalli-Sforza, L. L. / Insulin-like growth factor secretion by human B-lymphocytes : A comparison of cells from normal and pygmy subjects. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 1989 ; Vol. 69, No. 5. pp. 978-984.
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