Interaction of insulin and prior exercise in control of hepatic metabolism of a glucose load

R. Richard Pencek, Freyja James, D. Brooks Lacy, Kareem Jabbour, Phillip E. Williams, Patrick T. Fueger, David H. Wasserman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine if prior exercise enhances insulin-stimulated extraction of glucose by the liver, chronically catheterized dogs were submitted to 150 min of treadmill exercise or rest. After exercise or rest, dogs received portal glucose (18 μmol · kg-1 · min-1), peripheral somatostatin, and basal portal glucagon infusions from t = 0 to 150 min. A peripheral glucose infusion was used to clamp arterial blood glucose at 8.3 mmol/l. Insulin was infused into the portal vein to create either basal levels or mild hyperinsulinemia. Prior exercise did not increase whole-body glucose disposal in the presence of basal insulin (25.5 ± 1.5 vs. 20.3 ± 1.7 μmol · kg-1 · min-1), but resulted in a marked enhancement in the presence of elevated insulin (97.2 ± 15.1 vs. 64.4 ± 7.4 μmol · kg-1 · min-1). Prior exercise also increased net hepatic glucose uptake in the presence of both basal insulin (7.5 ± 1.2 vs. 2.9 ± 2.4 μmol · kg-1 · min-1) and elevated insulin (22.0 ± 3.5 vs. 11.5 ± 1.8 μmol · kg-1 · min-1). Likewise, net hepatic glucose fractional extraction was increased by prior exercise with both basal insulin (0.04 ± 0.01 vs. 0.01 ± 0.01 μmol · kg-1 · min-1) and elevated insulin (0.10 ± 0.01 vs. 0.05 ± 0.01). Hepatic glycogen synthesis was increased by elevated insulin, but was not enhanced by prior exercise. Although the increase in glucose extraction after exercise could be ascribed to increased insulin action, the increase in hepatic glycogen synthesis was independent of it.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1897-1903
Number of pages7
JournalDiabetes
Volume52
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Insulin
Glucose
Liver
Liver Glycogen
Dogs
Hyperinsulinism
Portal Vein
Somatostatin
Glucagon
Blood Glucose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Pencek, R. R., James, F., Lacy, D. B., Jabbour, K., Williams, P. E., Fueger, P. T., & Wasserman, D. H. (2003). Interaction of insulin and prior exercise in control of hepatic metabolism of a glucose load. Diabetes, 52(8), 1897-1903. https://doi.org/10.2337/diabetes.52.8.1897

Interaction of insulin and prior exercise in control of hepatic metabolism of a glucose load. / Pencek, R. Richard; James, Freyja; Lacy, D. Brooks; Jabbour, Kareem; Williams, Phillip E.; Fueger, Patrick T.; Wasserman, David H.

In: Diabetes, Vol. 52, No. 8, 01.08.2003, p. 1897-1903.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pencek, RR, James, F, Lacy, DB, Jabbour, K, Williams, PE, Fueger, PT & Wasserman, DH 2003, 'Interaction of insulin and prior exercise in control of hepatic metabolism of a glucose load', Diabetes, vol. 52, no. 8, pp. 1897-1903. https://doi.org/10.2337/diabetes.52.8.1897
Pencek RR, James F, Lacy DB, Jabbour K, Williams PE, Fueger PT et al. Interaction of insulin and prior exercise in control of hepatic metabolism of a glucose load. Diabetes. 2003 Aug 1;52(8):1897-1903. https://doi.org/10.2337/diabetes.52.8.1897
Pencek, R. Richard ; James, Freyja ; Lacy, D. Brooks ; Jabbour, Kareem ; Williams, Phillip E. ; Fueger, Patrick T. ; Wasserman, David H. / Interaction of insulin and prior exercise in control of hepatic metabolism of a glucose load. In: Diabetes. 2003 ; Vol. 52, No. 8. pp. 1897-1903.
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