Interleukins 18 and 21

Biology, mechanisms of action, toxicity, and clinical activity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Interleukins 18 and 21 have been described, and the effect of each upon immune response and experimental tumors in animals has been the subject of much recent work. Both interleukins have shown antitumor effects in animals, which in some models are striking for their duration, specificity, and ability to protect against rechallenge with the same tumor. These characteristics suggest immunologic involvements in the antitumor response, and several papers suggest involvement of both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Recent early phase I clinical trials in human cancer patients have demonstrated evidence of clinical response. This review discusses the biology, preclinical animal tumor model data, and early clinical trial findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)114-119
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Oncology Reports
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2006

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Interleukin-18
Neoplasms
Clinical Trials, Phase I
Interleukins
Animal Models
Clinical Trials
interleukin-21

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Interleukins 18 and 21 : Biology, mechanisms of action, toxicity, and clinical activity. / Logan, Theodore; Robertson, Michael.

In: Current Oncology Reports, Vol. 8, No. 2, 03.2006, p. 114-119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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