Interplay between toothbrush stiffness and dentifrice abrasivity on the development of non-carious cervical lesions

Cecilia P. Turssi, Fahad Binsaleh, Frank Lippert, Marco C. Bottino, George J. Eckert, Elizabeth A.S. Moser, Anderson Hara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This study investigated the effect of toothbrush stiffness and dentifrice slurry abrasivity on the development and progression of simulated non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs). Materials and methods: Human maxillary premolars were allocated to 12 groups generated by the association between toothbrushes, soft, medium, and hard stiffness, and simulated dentifrice slurries, lower, medium, and higher; deionized water (DI) served as negative control. Teeth were mounted on acrylic blocks, and their root surfaces partially covered with acrylic resin to simulate gingiva, leaving a 2-mm area apical to the cemento-enamel junction exposed to toothbrushing. Specimens were brushed with the test slurries for 35,000 and 65,000 double strokes. Impressions taken at baseline and after both brushing periods were scanned by a 3D optical profilometer. Dentin volume loss (mm3) was calculated by image subtraction. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Fisher’s PLSD tests. Results: All toothbrushes caused higher volume loss when associated to higher abrasive slurry, compared to medium- and lower-abrasive slurries. Medium caused more volume loss than lower-abrasive slurry, which led to more volume loss than DI. Hard and medium toothbrushes were not different when used with medium- or higher-abrasive slurries. There were no differences among toothbrushes when used with DI and lower-abrasive slurry. Overall, 35,000 brushing strokes resulted in significantly less volume loss than 65,000. Conclusions: Toothbrush stiffness was an important factor on NCCL development, especially when brushing with medium- and higher-abrasive slurries. Clinical relevance: Medium and hard toothbrushes associated with medium- and high-abrasive toothpastes can yield more severe NCCLs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Oral Investigations
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Keywords

  • Abrasivity
  • Dentifrice
  • Dentin
  • Non-carious cervical lesions
  • Toothbrush
  • Toothpaste

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

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