Intragastric self-infusion of ethanol by ethanol-preferring and -nonpreferring lines of rats

Marshall B. Waller, William J. McBride, Gregory J. Gatto, Lawrence Lumeng, Ting Kai Li

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Abstract

An ethanol-preferring line of rats, developed by selective breeding, consumed as much as 9.4±1.7 grams of ethanol per kilogram of body weight per day through intrasgastric self-infusions, yielding blood ethanol concentrations of 92 to 415 milligrams per 100 milliliters. By contrast, the ethanol-nonpreferring line self-administered only 0.7±0.2 gram per kilogram per day. These findings indicate that the reinforcing effect of ethanol is postabsorptive and is not mediated by the drug's smell or taste. Hence the ethanol-preferring line of rats may be a suitable animal model of alcoholism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)78-80
Number of pages3
JournalScience
Volume225
Issue number4657
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

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    Waller, M. B., McBride, W. J., Gatto, G. J., Lumeng, L., & Li, T. K. (1984). Intragastric self-infusion of ethanol by ethanol-preferring and -nonpreferring lines of rats. Science, 225(4657), 78-80. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.6539502