Intravenous glucose suppresses glucose production but not proteolysis in extremely premature newborns

David E. Hertz, Cheryl A. Karn, Ya Mei Liu, Edward A. Liechty, Scott C. Denne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

To ascertain whether the inability to suppress glucose production and increase glucose utilization in response to glucose infusion is an inherent characteristic of immature individuals, we determined glucose rate of appearance (Ra) in minimally stressed, clinically stable, extremely premature infants ( ∼ 26-wk gestation) at two glucose infusion rates (6.2±0.4 and 9.5±0.5 mg/kg per min). We also assessed whether an increase in glucose delivery suppresses proteolysis by measuring the Ra of phenylalanine and leucine. Glucose Ra (and utilization) increased significantly at the higher glucose infusion rate (7.9±0.5 vs. 9.8±0.6 mg/kg per min). Glucose production persisted at the lower glucose infusion rate but was suppressed to nearly zero at the higher rate (1.7±0.5 vs. 0.3±0.1 mg/kg per min). Proteolysis was unaffected by the higher glucose infusion rate as reflected by no change in the rates of appearance of either phenylalanine (96±5 vs. 95±3 μmol/kg per h) or leucine (285±20 vs. 283±14 μmol/kg per h). Thus, clinically stable, extremely premature infants suppress glucose production and increase glucose utilization in response to increased glucose infusion, demonstrating no inherent immaturity of these processes. In contrast, increasing the rate of glucose delivery results in no change in whole body proteolysis in these infants. The regulation of proteolysis in this population remains to be defined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1752-1758
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume92
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

Keywords

  • Glucose utilization
  • Leucine
  • Phenylalanine
  • Protein turnover
  • Stable isotope tracers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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