Involvement of CNS cholinergic systems in alcohol drinking of P rats

S. N. Katner, W. J. McBride, L. Lumeng, T. K. Li, J. M. Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Experiments were undertaken to determine if CNS muscarinic- and nicotinic-cholinergic receptors are involved in regulating alcohol drinking of rats from the selectively-bred alcohol-preferring P line. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) drug infusions were administered into the lateral ventricle of female P rats 15 minutes before ethanol access. The muscarinic antagonists pirenzepine and scopolamine were tested on limited access (4 hours/day) to a 10% (v/v) ethanol solution. Food and water were available ad libitum. Nicotine and the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine were tested on limited access (4 hours/day) to 10% (v/v) ethanol and 0.0125% saccharin solutions. Food was available ad libitum and water was available during the remaining 20 hours. The baseline ethanol intakes ranged between an average of 3.0 ± 0.3 g/kg/4 hours and 3.4 ± 0.3 g/kg/4 hours. Administration of 40-100 μg pirenzepine (M1-selective antagonist) had no effect on ethanol, food or water consumption. However, 20-80 μg scopolamine, a non-selective muscarinic antagonist, dose-dependently decreased ethanol intake as much as 60% (p < 0.05) without altering food or water consumption. The nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (20-120 μg) did not alter ethanol intake, but nicotine (40-80 μg) dose-dependently decreased ethanol drinking as much as 60% within the first 30 minutes (p < 0.05) without an effect on saccharin intake. The results suggest that: (a), muscarinic receptors, with the possible exception of the M1 subtype, are involved in regulating alcohol drinking and (b), activation of nicotinic receptors can reduce alcohol drinking of the P line of rats.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)215-223
Number of pages9
JournalAddiction Biology
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

Fingerprint

Alcohol Drinking
Cholinergic Agents
Ethanol
Nicotinic Antagonists
Drinking
Mecamylamine
Pirenzepine
Saccharin
Food
Muscarinic Antagonists
Scopolamine Hydrobromide
Nicotinic Receptors
Nicotine
Intraventricular Infusions
Water
Lateral Ventricles
Cholinergic Receptors
Muscarinic Receptors
Alcohols
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Katner, S. N., McBride, W. J., Lumeng, L., Li, T. K., & Murphy, J. M. (1997). Involvement of CNS cholinergic systems in alcohol drinking of P rats. Addiction Biology, 2(2), 215-223. https://doi.org/10.1080/13556219772769

Involvement of CNS cholinergic systems in alcohol drinking of P rats. / Katner, S. N.; McBride, W. J.; Lumeng, L.; Li, T. K.; Murphy, J. M.

In: Addiction Biology, Vol. 2, No. 2, 1997, p. 215-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Katner, SN, McBride, WJ, Lumeng, L, Li, TK & Murphy, JM 1997, 'Involvement of CNS cholinergic systems in alcohol drinking of P rats', Addiction Biology, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 215-223. https://doi.org/10.1080/13556219772769
Katner, S. N. ; McBride, W. J. ; Lumeng, L. ; Li, T. K. ; Murphy, J. M. / Involvement of CNS cholinergic systems in alcohol drinking of P rats. In: Addiction Biology. 1997 ; Vol. 2, No. 2. pp. 215-223.
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