Is cholinergic sensitivity a genetic marker for the affective disorders?

D. S. Janowsky, D. H. Overstreet, John Nurnberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

113 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The recent literature on the involvement of cholinergic muscarinic mechanisms and adrenergic/cholinergic balance in affective disorders is reviewed and integrated with the older literature. There is strong evidence supporting the presence of exaggerated responses (behavioral, neuroendocrine, sleep) to cholinergic agents in affective disorder patients relative to normal controls and certain other psychiatric patients. There is also some, albeit less, conclusive evidence that these exaggerated responses may occur in euthymic individuals with a history of affective disorders, or in children at risk for development of affective disorders. Despite these promising results, suggesting a role for acetylcholine in the genetics of the affective disorders, further work in biochemistry and genetics is needed to link specific muscarinic receptors or other cholinergic variables to affective illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-344
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics
Volume54
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mood Disorders
Genetic Markers
Cholinergic Agents
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Muscarinic Receptors
Biochemistry
Adrenergic Agents
Acetylcholine
Psychiatry
Sleep

Keywords

  • acetylcholine
  • affective disorders
  • depression
  • genetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Is cholinergic sensitivity a genetic marker for the affective disorders? / Janowsky, D. S.; Overstreet, D. H.; Nurnberger, John.

In: American Journal of Medical Genetics, Vol. 54, No. 4, 1994, p. 335-344.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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