Is endothelium the origin of endothelial progenitor cells?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

125 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Endothelial cells provide the dynamic lining of blood vessels throughout the body and provide many tissue-specific functions, in addition to providing a nonthrombogenic surface for blood cells and conduit for oxygen and nutrient delivery. As might be expected, some endothelial cells are injured or become senescent and are sloughed into the bloodstream, and most circulating endothelial cells display evidence of undergoing apoptosis or necrosis. However, there are rare viable circulating endothelial cells that display properties consistent with those of a progenitor cell for the endothelial lineage. This article reviews historical and current literature to present some evidence that the endothelial lining of blood vessels may serve as a source for rare endothelial colony-forming cells that display clonal proliferative potential, self-renewal, and in vivo vessel forming ability. The article also discusses the current gaps in our knowledge to prove whether the colony-forming cells are in fact derived from vascular endothelium.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1094-1103
Number of pages10
JournalArteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010

Fingerprint

Endothelium
Endothelial Cells
Blood Vessels
Vascular Endothelium
Cell Lineage
Blood Cells
Necrosis
Stem Cells
Apoptosis
Oxygen
Food
Endothelial Progenitor Cells

Keywords

  • Angiogenesis
  • Endothelial function
  • Endothelial progenitor cells
  • Endothelium
  • Thrombosis
  • Vascular endothelial cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Is endothelium the origin of endothelial progenitor cells? / Yoder, Mervin.

In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, Vol. 30, No. 6, 06.2010, p. 1094-1103.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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