Is There a Functional Benefit to Obtaining High Flexion After Total Knee Arthroplasty?

R. Meneghini, Jeffery L. Pierson, Deren Bagsby, Mary Ziemba-Davis, Michael E. Berend, Merrill A. Ritter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clinical evidence is lacking to support the functional benefit of high flexion after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A retrospective review of 511 TKAs in 370 patients was performed. The mean follow-up was 3.7 years (range, 2-8 years). Regression analysis determined the effect of obtaining high flexion (>125°) on Knee Society, stair, function, and pain scores. Of 511 TKAs, 340 (66.5%) obtained range of motion greater than 115°, and 63 (12.3%) TKAs obtained high flexion greater than 125°. There was no difference between the patients who obtained flexion greater than 115° and those who obtained high flexion greater than 125° in Knee Society scores (P = .34) and function scores (P = .57). Patients with greater than 125° of flexion are 1.56 times more likely to demonstrate optimal stair function (P = .02). Obtaining flexion greater than 125° after TKA does not offer a benefit in overall knee function. However, obtaining a high degree of flexion appears to optimize stair climbing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-46
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Arthroplasty
Volume22
Issue number6 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007

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Knee Replacement Arthroplasties
Articular Range of Motion
Knee
Regression Analysis
Pain

Keywords

  • high flexion
  • knee arthroplasty
  • knee replacement
  • outcomes
  • range of motion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Meneghini, R., Pierson, J. L., Bagsby, D., Ziemba-Davis, M., Berend, M. E., & Ritter, M. A. (2007). Is There a Functional Benefit to Obtaining High Flexion After Total Knee Arthroplasty? Journal of Arthroplasty, 22(6 SUPPL.), 43-46. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arth.2007.03.011

Is There a Functional Benefit to Obtaining High Flexion After Total Knee Arthroplasty? / Meneghini, R.; Pierson, Jeffery L.; Bagsby, Deren; Ziemba-Davis, Mary; Berend, Michael E.; Ritter, Merrill A.

In: Journal of Arthroplasty, Vol. 22, No. 6 SUPPL., 09.2007, p. 43-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meneghini, R, Pierson, JL, Bagsby, D, Ziemba-Davis, M, Berend, ME & Ritter, MA 2007, 'Is There a Functional Benefit to Obtaining High Flexion After Total Knee Arthroplasty?', Journal of Arthroplasty, vol. 22, no. 6 SUPPL., pp. 43-46. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arth.2007.03.011
Meneghini, R. ; Pierson, Jeffery L. ; Bagsby, Deren ; Ziemba-Davis, Mary ; Berend, Michael E. ; Ritter, Merrill A. / Is There a Functional Benefit to Obtaining High Flexion After Total Knee Arthroplasty?. In: Journal of Arthroplasty. 2007 ; Vol. 22, No. 6 SUPPL. pp. 43-46.
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