Issues in genetic testing for susceptibility to alcoholism: Lessons from Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease

Kimberly A. Quaid, Stephen H. Dinwiddie, P. Michael Conneally, John I. Nurnberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Evidence from family, twin, and adoption studies suggests a heritable basis for alcoholism. However, alcoholism is likely to be genetically heterogeneous, and any genetic connection is likely to be in the form of genes conferring an increased risk or susceptibility. In this study, we present the evidence for a genetic component for alcoholism, and examine the precedent for genetic testing and screening for genetic susceptibility using Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's disease as examples. Finally, we discuss the preparations that need to be made before taking any findings about the genetics of alcoholism from the research laboratory into the clinic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1430-1437
Number of pages8
JournalAlcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
Volume20
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

Keywords

  • Alcoholism
  • Genetics
  • Susceptibility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Toxicology

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