Lack of seasonal variation in idiopathic talipes equinovarus

Randall T. Loder, David M. Drvaric, Brian Carney, Zachary Hamby, Simon Barker, David Chesney, Nicola Maffulli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: One proposed etiology of idiopathic talipes equinovarus is an in utero enterovirus infection. Enterovirus infections demonstrate seasonal variation in temperate climates. Methods: We collected data on 1202 children with idiopathic talipes equinovarus born in the Northeastern United States, Midwestern United States, and the United Kingdom to investigate a seasonal variation in this congenital deformity. Birth date, gestational age at the time of delivery, gender, race, and laterality were tabulated and subjected to univariate and bivariate analyses. Results: There were 774 boys and 428 girls with idiopathic talipes equinovarus. The birth location was the United Kingdom (458 children), the Midwestern United States (426 children), and the Northeastern United States (318 children). No significant differences were detected among the geographic groups with respect to gender, race, or laterality, and no variation in month of birth or month of conception was noted. Conclusions: This study does not support an in utero enterovirus infection as an etiology of idiopathic talipes equinovarus in industrialized populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)496-502
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series A
Volume88
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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    Loder, R. T., Drvaric, D. M., Carney, B., Hamby, Z., Barker, S., Chesney, D., & Maffulli, N. (2006). Lack of seasonal variation in idiopathic talipes equinovarus. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series A, 88(3), 496-502. https://doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.E.00093