Law and policy in the era of reproductive genetics

T. Caulfield, L. Knowles, E. M. Meslin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The extent to which society utilises the law to enforce its moral judgments remains a dominant issue in this era of embryonic stem cell research, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and human reproductive cloning. Balancing the potential health benefits and diverse moral values of society can be a tremendous challenge. In this context, governments often adopt legislative bans and prohibitions and rely on the inflexible and often inappropriate tool of criminal law. Legal prohibitions in the field of reproductive genetics are not likely to reflect adequately the depth and diversity of competing stakeholder positions. Rather, a comprehensive and readily responsive regulatory policy is required. Such a policy must attend to the evolving scientific developments and ethical considerations. We outline a proposal for effective, responsive, and coherent oversight of new reproductive genetic technologies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)414-417
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Medical Ethics
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2004

Fingerprint

Preimplantation Diagnosis
Reproductive Techniques
Stem Cell Research
Criminal Law
Law
Insurance Benefits
stem cell research
Organism Cloning
regulatory policy
moral judgement
criminal law
ban
stakeholder
health
Prohibition
Values
Society
Health
Moral Judgment
Embryonic Stem Cell Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Law and policy in the era of reproductive genetics. / Caulfield, T.; Knowles, L.; Meslin, E. M.

In: Journal of Medical Ethics, Vol. 30, No. 4, 08.2004, p. 414-417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Caulfield, T, Knowles, L & Meslin, EM 2004, 'Law and policy in the era of reproductive genetics', Journal of Medical Ethics, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 414-417. https://doi.org/10.1136/jme.2002.001370
Caulfield, T. ; Knowles, L. ; Meslin, E. M. / Law and policy in the era of reproductive genetics. In: Journal of Medical Ethics. 2004 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 414-417.
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