Leapfrogging paper-based records using handheld technology: Experience from Western Kenya

Martin C. Were, James Kariuki, Viola Chepng'Eno, Margaret Wandabwa, Samson Ndege, Paula Braitstein, Juddy Wachira, Sylvester Kimaiyo, Burke Mamlin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Problem: There is limited experience with broad-based use of handheld technologies for clinical care during home visits in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective: We describe the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of a PDA/GPS-based system currently used during home visits in Western Kenya. Results: The system, built on Pendragon Forms, was used to create electronic health records for over 40,000 individuals over a three-month period. Of these, 1900 represented cases where the individual had never received care for the identified condition in an established care facility. On a five-point scale, and compared to paper-and-pen systems, end-users felt that the handheld system was faster (4.4 ± 0.9), easier to use (4.5 ± 0.8), and produced higher quality data (4.7 ± 0.7). Projected over three years to cover two million people, use of the handheld technologies would cost about $0.15 per person - compared to $0.21 per individual encounter entered manually into a computer from a paper form. Conclusion: A PDA/GPS system has been successfully and broadly implemented to support clinical care during home-based visits in a resource-limited setting.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationStudies in Health Technology and Informatics
Pages525-529
Number of pages5
Volume160
EditionPART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Event13th World Congress on Medical and Health Informatics, Medinfo 2010 - Cape Town, South Africa
Duration: Sep 12 2010Sep 15 2010

Other

Other13th World Congress on Medical and Health Informatics, Medinfo 2010
CountrySouth Africa
CityCape Town
Period9/12/109/15/10

Fingerprint

House Calls
Kenya
Personal digital assistants
Global positioning system
Technology
Africa South of the Sahara
Electronic Health Records
Health
Costs
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Computerized medical records systems
  • Developing countries
  • Handheld computers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

Were, M. C., Kariuki, J., Chepng'Eno, V., Wandabwa, M., Ndege, S., Braitstein, P., ... Mamlin, B. (2010). Leapfrogging paper-based records using handheld technology: Experience from Western Kenya. In Studies in Health Technology and Informatics (PART 1 ed., Vol. 160, pp. 525-529) https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-60750-588-4-525

Leapfrogging paper-based records using handheld technology : Experience from Western Kenya. / Were, Martin C.; Kariuki, James; Chepng'Eno, Viola; Wandabwa, Margaret; Ndege, Samson; Braitstein, Paula; Wachira, Juddy; Kimaiyo, Sylvester; Mamlin, Burke.

Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 160 PART 1. ed. 2010. p. 525-529.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Were, MC, Kariuki, J, Chepng'Eno, V, Wandabwa, M, Ndege, S, Braitstein, P, Wachira, J, Kimaiyo, S & Mamlin, B 2010, Leapfrogging paper-based records using handheld technology: Experience from Western Kenya. in Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. PART 1 edn, vol. 160, pp. 525-529, 13th World Congress on Medical and Health Informatics, Medinfo 2010, Cape Town, South Africa, 9/12/10. https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-60750-588-4-525
Were MC, Kariuki J, Chepng'Eno V, Wandabwa M, Ndege S, Braitstein P et al. Leapfrogging paper-based records using handheld technology: Experience from Western Kenya. In Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. PART 1 ed. Vol. 160. 2010. p. 525-529 https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-60750-588-4-525
Were, Martin C. ; Kariuki, James ; Chepng'Eno, Viola ; Wandabwa, Margaret ; Ndege, Samson ; Braitstein, Paula ; Wachira, Juddy ; Kimaiyo, Sylvester ; Mamlin, Burke. / Leapfrogging paper-based records using handheld technology : Experience from Western Kenya. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 160 PART 1. ed. 2010. pp. 525-529
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