Learning outcomes with visual thinking strategies in nursing education

Margaret Moorman, Desiree Hensel, Kim A. Decker, Katie Busby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There is a need to develop innovative strategies that cultivate broad cognitive, intrapersonal, and interpersonal skills in nursing curricula. The purpose of this project was to explore transferable skills students gained from Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS). Method: This qualitative descriptive study was conducted with 55 baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in an entry level healthy population course. The students participated in a 1. h VTS session led by a trained facilitator. Data came from the group's written responses to a question about how they would use skills learned from VTS in caring for patients and in their nursing practice. Results: Content analysis showed students perceived gaining observational, cognitive, interpersonal, and intrapersonal skills from the VTS session. Conclusions: VTS is a unique teaching strategy that holds the potential to help nursing students develop a broad range of skills. Studies are needed on optimal exposure needed to develop observational, communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills. Research is also needed on how skills gained in VTS translate to practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNurse Education Today
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016

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Nursing Education
nursing
Learning
learning
education
Nursing Students
student
Students
Nursing
entry level
teaching strategy
Thinking
qualitative method
content analysis
Curriculum
Teaching
Communication
curriculum
communication
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Learning outcomes with visual thinking strategies in nursing education. / Moorman, Margaret; Hensel, Desiree; Decker, Kim A.; Busby, Katie.

In: Nurse Education Today, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moorman, Margaret ; Hensel, Desiree ; Decker, Kim A. ; Busby, Katie. / Learning outcomes with visual thinking strategies in nursing education. In: Nurse Education Today. 2016.
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