Leptin plasma levels in healthy Spanish children and adolescents, children with obesity, and adolescents anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa

J. Argente, I. Barrios, J. A. Chowen, M. K. Sinha, Robert Considine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

104 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: (1) To investigate normal circulating levels of leptin in children at various stages of pubertal maturation (Tanner stages) according to sex; and (2) to analyze serum leptin levels in pediatric patents with eating disorders (obesity, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia nervosa). Study design: Fasting leptin levels were studied in normal healthy boys and girls throughout development. Obese pediatric subjects and patients with anorexia nervosa were studied at the time of diagnosis and after 6 months and 1 year of treatment for weight reduction or weight recuperation, respectively. Patients with bulimia nervosa were studied at the moment of diagnosis. Results: Leptin levels in both boys and girls vary significantly depending on the maturational stage, being low in both sexes at Tanner stage I and rising significantly by Tanner stage III. In girls, there was a further increase by Tanner stage V and a significant decrease in boys, resulting in a sexual dimorphism in Tanner V subjects. In obese prepubertal patients, leptin levels were significantly elevated at the time of diagnosis and declined significantly with weight loss (ANOVA: p <0.0001). In anorexia nervosa patients' leptin levels are significantly reduced compared with age- and sex- matched controls (p <0.0001). These levels remain significantly lower even after recovery of at least 10% of the original body weight and 1 year later. In patients with bulimia leptin levels were reduced at the time of diagnosis but were significantly higher than in patients with anorexia. Conclusion: In normal pediatric subjects leptin levels are highly correlated with the body mass index, but this is not the case in eating disorders, where the body mass index is either significantly elevated or reduced. Both age and sex should be taken into consideration when analyzing serum leptin levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)833-838
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume131
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bulimia Nervosa
Pediatric Obesity
Anorexia Nervosa
Leptin
Pediatrics
Weight Loss
Body Mass Index
Bulimia
Patents
Anorexia
Serum
Sex Characteristics
Fasting
Analysis of Variance
Obesity
Body Weight
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Leptin plasma levels in healthy Spanish children and adolescents, children with obesity, and adolescents anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. / Argente, J.; Barrios, I.; Chowen, J. A.; Sinha, M. K.; Considine, Robert.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 131, No. 6, 1997, p. 833-838.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{334b14fea22b4e39bd8c6cf1ae7027c8,
title = "Leptin plasma levels in healthy Spanish children and adolescents, children with obesity, and adolescents anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa",
abstract = "Objectives: (1) To investigate normal circulating levels of leptin in children at various stages of pubertal maturation (Tanner stages) according to sex; and (2) to analyze serum leptin levels in pediatric patents with eating disorders (obesity, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia nervosa). Study design: Fasting leptin levels were studied in normal healthy boys and girls throughout development. Obese pediatric subjects and patients with anorexia nervosa were studied at the time of diagnosis and after 6 months and 1 year of treatment for weight reduction or weight recuperation, respectively. Patients with bulimia nervosa were studied at the moment of diagnosis. Results: Leptin levels in both boys and girls vary significantly depending on the maturational stage, being low in both sexes at Tanner stage I and rising significantly by Tanner stage III. In girls, there was a further increase by Tanner stage V and a significant decrease in boys, resulting in a sexual dimorphism in Tanner V subjects. In obese prepubertal patients, leptin levels were significantly elevated at the time of diagnosis and declined significantly with weight loss (ANOVA: p <0.0001). In anorexia nervosa patients' leptin levels are significantly reduced compared with age- and sex- matched controls (p <0.0001). These levels remain significantly lower even after recovery of at least 10{\%} of the original body weight and 1 year later. In patients with bulimia leptin levels were reduced at the time of diagnosis but were significantly higher than in patients with anorexia. Conclusion: In normal pediatric subjects leptin levels are highly correlated with the body mass index, but this is not the case in eating disorders, where the body mass index is either significantly elevated or reduced. Both age and sex should be taken into consideration when analyzing serum leptin levels.",
author = "J. Argente and I. Barrios and Chowen, {J. A.} and Sinha, {M. K.} and Robert Considine",
year = "1997",
doi = "10.1016/S0022-3476(97)70029-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "131",
pages = "833--838",
journal = "Journal of Pediatrics",
issn = "0022-3476",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Leptin plasma levels in healthy Spanish children and adolescents, children with obesity, and adolescents anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa

AU - Argente, J.

AU - Barrios, I.

AU - Chowen, J. A.

AU - Sinha, M. K.

AU - Considine, Robert

PY - 1997

Y1 - 1997

N2 - Objectives: (1) To investigate normal circulating levels of leptin in children at various stages of pubertal maturation (Tanner stages) according to sex; and (2) to analyze serum leptin levels in pediatric patents with eating disorders (obesity, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia nervosa). Study design: Fasting leptin levels were studied in normal healthy boys and girls throughout development. Obese pediatric subjects and patients with anorexia nervosa were studied at the time of diagnosis and after 6 months and 1 year of treatment for weight reduction or weight recuperation, respectively. Patients with bulimia nervosa were studied at the moment of diagnosis. Results: Leptin levels in both boys and girls vary significantly depending on the maturational stage, being low in both sexes at Tanner stage I and rising significantly by Tanner stage III. In girls, there was a further increase by Tanner stage V and a significant decrease in boys, resulting in a sexual dimorphism in Tanner V subjects. In obese prepubertal patients, leptin levels were significantly elevated at the time of diagnosis and declined significantly with weight loss (ANOVA: p <0.0001). In anorexia nervosa patients' leptin levels are significantly reduced compared with age- and sex- matched controls (p <0.0001). These levels remain significantly lower even after recovery of at least 10% of the original body weight and 1 year later. In patients with bulimia leptin levels were reduced at the time of diagnosis but were significantly higher than in patients with anorexia. Conclusion: In normal pediatric subjects leptin levels are highly correlated with the body mass index, but this is not the case in eating disorders, where the body mass index is either significantly elevated or reduced. Both age and sex should be taken into consideration when analyzing serum leptin levels.

AB - Objectives: (1) To investigate normal circulating levels of leptin in children at various stages of pubertal maturation (Tanner stages) according to sex; and (2) to analyze serum leptin levels in pediatric patents with eating disorders (obesity, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia nervosa). Study design: Fasting leptin levels were studied in normal healthy boys and girls throughout development. Obese pediatric subjects and patients with anorexia nervosa were studied at the time of diagnosis and after 6 months and 1 year of treatment for weight reduction or weight recuperation, respectively. Patients with bulimia nervosa were studied at the moment of diagnosis. Results: Leptin levels in both boys and girls vary significantly depending on the maturational stage, being low in both sexes at Tanner stage I and rising significantly by Tanner stage III. In girls, there was a further increase by Tanner stage V and a significant decrease in boys, resulting in a sexual dimorphism in Tanner V subjects. In obese prepubertal patients, leptin levels were significantly elevated at the time of diagnosis and declined significantly with weight loss (ANOVA: p <0.0001). In anorexia nervosa patients' leptin levels are significantly reduced compared with age- and sex- matched controls (p <0.0001). These levels remain significantly lower even after recovery of at least 10% of the original body weight and 1 year later. In patients with bulimia leptin levels were reduced at the time of diagnosis but were significantly higher than in patients with anorexia. Conclusion: In normal pediatric subjects leptin levels are highly correlated with the body mass index, but this is not the case in eating disorders, where the body mass index is either significantly elevated or reduced. Both age and sex should be taken into consideration when analyzing serum leptin levels.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031444646&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031444646&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0022-3476(97)70029-5

DO - 10.1016/S0022-3476(97)70029-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 9427886

AN - SCOPUS:0031444646

VL - 131

SP - 833

EP - 838

JO - Journal of Pediatrics

JF - Journal of Pediatrics

SN - 0022-3476

IS - 6

ER -