Leveraging syntactic and semantic graph kernels to extract pharmacokinetic drug drug interactions from biomedical literature

Yaoyun Zhang, Heng Yi Wu, Jun Xu, Jingqi Wang, Ergin Soysal, Lang Li, Hua Xu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Information about drug-drug interactions (DDIs) supported by scientific evidence is crucial for establishing computational knowledge bases for applications like pharmacovigilance. Since new reports of DDIs are rapidly accumulating in the scientific literature, text-mining techniques for automatic DDI extraction are critical. We propose a novel approach for automated pharmacokinetic (PK) DDI detection that incorporates syntactic and semantic information into graph kernels, to address the problem of sparseness associated with syntactic-structural approaches. First, we used a novel all-path graph kernel using shallow semantic representation of sentences. Next, we statistically integrated fine-granular semantic classes into the dependency and shallow semantic graphs. Results: When evaluated on the PK DDI corpus, our approach significantly outperformed the original all-path graph kernel that is based on dependency structure. Our system that combined dependency graph kernel with semantic classes achieved the best F-scores of 81.94 % for in vivo PK DDIs and 69.34 % for in vitro PK DDIs, respectively. Further, combining shallow semantic graph kernel with semantic classes achieved the highest precisions of 84.88 % for in vivo PK DDIs and 74.83 % for in vitro PK DDIs, respectively. Conclusions: We presented a graph kernel based approach to combine syntactic and semantic information for extracting pharmacokinetic DDIs from Biomedical Literature. Experimental results showed that our proposed approach could extract PK DDIs from literature effectively, which significantly enhanced the performance of the original all-path graph kernel based on dependency structure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number67
JournalBMC Systems Biology
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 26 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Structural Biology
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Molecular Biology
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics

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