Limited nucleosome migration can completely randomize DNA repair patches in intact human cells

Gregory E. Arnold, A. Keith Dunker, Michael J. Smerdon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Following irradiation of human cells with ultraviolet light, DNA repair patches are initially inserted near the 5′ and 3′ ends of nucleosome core DNA leaving a "gap" in repair synthesis (of ~ 50 bases) near the center of the core DNA. With time, however, these same repair patches become randomized, apparently by nucleosome migration. We have developed both an analytical expression and a computer algorithm (which simulates nucleosome migration along DNA) to determine the average distance nucleosomes must migrate to change the initial, non-uniform distribution of repair patches in nucleosomes to a random distribution. Both of these methods yielded the same result: nucleosomes must migrate an average of about 50 base-pairs in either direction to produce the randomization observed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)433-436
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of molecular biology
Volume196
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 20 1987
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Structural Biology
  • Molecular Biology

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