Local-circuit phenotypes of layer 5 neurons in motor-frontal cortex of YFP-H mice

Jianing Yu, Charles T. Anderson, Taro Kiritani, Patrick Sheets, David L. Wokosin, Lydia Wood, Gordon M G Shepherd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Layer 5 pyramidal neurons comprise an important but heterogeneous group of cortical projection neurons. In motor-frontal cortex, these neurons are centrally involved in the cortical control of movement. Recent studies indicate that local excitatory networks in mouse motor-frontal cortex are dominated by descending pathways from layer 2/3 to 5. However, those pathways were identified in experiments involving unlabeled neurons in wild type mice. Here, to explore the possibility of class-specific connectivity in this descending pathway, we mapped the local sources of excitatory synaptic input to a genetically labeled population of cortical neurons: YFP-positive layer 5 neurons of YFP-H mice. We found, first, that in motor cortex, YFP-positive neurons were distributed in a double blade, consistent with the idea of layer 5B having greater thickness in frontal neocortex. Second, whereas unlabeled neurons in upper layer 5 received their strongest inputs from layer 2, YFP-positive neurons in the upper blade received prominent layer 3 inputs. Third, YFP-positive neurons exhibited distinct electrophysiological properties, including low spike frequency adaptation, as reported previously. Our results with this genetically labeled neuronal population indicate the presence of distinct local-circuit phenotypes among layer 5 pyramidal neurons in mouse motor-frontal cortex, and present a paradigm for investigating local circuit organization in other genetically labeled populations of cortical neurons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number6
JournalFrontiers in Neural Circuits
Volume2
Issue numberDEC
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 24 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Motor Cortex
Frontal Lobe
Phenotype
Neurons
Pyramidal Cells
Population
Neocortex

Keywords

  • Cortical microcircuit
  • Glutamate uncaging
  • Layer 5
  • Photostimulation
  • Pyramidal neuron
  • Synaptic connectivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Yu, J., Anderson, C. T., Kiritani, T., Sheets, P., Wokosin, D. L., Wood, L., & Shepherd, G. M. G. (2008). Local-circuit phenotypes of layer 5 neurons in motor-frontal cortex of YFP-H mice. Frontiers in Neural Circuits, 2(DEC), [6]. https://doi.org/10.3389/neuro.04.006.2008

Local-circuit phenotypes of layer 5 neurons in motor-frontal cortex of YFP-H mice. / Yu, Jianing; Anderson, Charles T.; Kiritani, Taro; Sheets, Patrick; Wokosin, David L.; Wood, Lydia; Shepherd, Gordon M G.

In: Frontiers in Neural Circuits, Vol. 2, No. DEC, 6, 24.12.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yu, Jianing ; Anderson, Charles T. ; Kiritani, Taro ; Sheets, Patrick ; Wokosin, David L. ; Wood, Lydia ; Shepherd, Gordon M G. / Local-circuit phenotypes of layer 5 neurons in motor-frontal cortex of YFP-H mice. In: Frontiers in Neural Circuits. 2008 ; Vol. 2, No. DEC.
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