Long-term care preferences of hospitalized persons with AIDS

Wayne C. McCormick, Thomas Inui, Richard A. Deyo, Robert W. Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective:To determine in a cohort of hospitalized persons with AIDS: 1) their preferences for various postdischarge long-term care settings, 2) the postdischarge settings recommended by primary care providers (doctors, nurses, and social workers), and 3) the impact of these views on the resulting discharge dispositions. Design:Prospective cohort study. Setting:Medical wards of five Seattle tertiary care hospitals. Participants:120 consecutive hospitalized persons with AIDS and their primary care providers. Measurements and main results:Although 70 (58%) of the patients found care in an AIDS long-term care facility acceptable, 87 (73%) preferred home care. Thirty-eight (32%) of the cohort were appropriate for long-term care after hospitalization, according to primary care providers. Eleven of the 38 patients deemed appropriate for long-term care were discharged to long-term care settings; among these, three had preferred home care. Likelihood of discharge to long-term care settings increased if patients found it acceptable (OR=7.1; 95% CI=3.2, 15.5), if they did not prefer home care (OR=7.7; 95% CI=4.7, 13.5), and if providers judged them to be appropriate for long-term care (OR=29; 95% CI=13, 64). In unstructured interviews, availability of emotional and medical support and privacy emerged as important factors to persons with AIDS considering long-term care. Conclusions:Hospitalized persons with AIDS willingly express their desires for various postdischarge care settings. A majority find long-term care in AIDS facilities acceptable, although they generally prefer home care. Discharge disposition is associated with acceptability, preference, and appropriateness for long-term care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)524-528
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of General Internal Medicine
Volume6
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Long-Term Care
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Home Care Services
Primary Health Care
Privacy
Tertiary Healthcare
Tertiary Care Centers
Patient Care
Hospitalization
Cohort Studies
Nurses
Prospective Studies
Interviews

Keywords

  • acceptability of health care
  • AIDS
  • discharge planning
  • long-term care
  • patient preferences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Long-term care preferences of hospitalized persons with AIDS. / McCormick, Wayne C.; Inui, Thomas; Deyo, Richard A.; Wood, Robert W.

In: Journal of General Internal Medicine, Vol. 6, No. 6, 11.1991, p. 524-528.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McCormick, Wayne C. ; Inui, Thomas ; Deyo, Richard A. ; Wood, Robert W. / Long-term care preferences of hospitalized persons with AIDS. In: Journal of General Internal Medicine. 1991 ; Vol. 6, No. 6. pp. 524-528.
@article{fa6677fdc7314880af684ed2620aaeb5,
title = "Long-term care preferences of hospitalized persons with AIDS",
abstract = "Objective:To determine in a cohort of hospitalized persons with AIDS: 1) their preferences for various postdischarge long-term care settings, 2) the postdischarge settings recommended by primary care providers (doctors, nurses, and social workers), and 3) the impact of these views on the resulting discharge dispositions. Design:Prospective cohort study. Setting:Medical wards of five Seattle tertiary care hospitals. Participants:120 consecutive hospitalized persons with AIDS and their primary care providers. Measurements and main results:Although 70 (58{\%}) of the patients found care in an AIDS long-term care facility acceptable, 87 (73{\%}) preferred home care. Thirty-eight (32{\%}) of the cohort were appropriate for long-term care after hospitalization, according to primary care providers. Eleven of the 38 patients deemed appropriate for long-term care were discharged to long-term care settings; among these, three had preferred home care. Likelihood of discharge to long-term care settings increased if patients found it acceptable (OR=7.1; 95{\%} CI=3.2, 15.5), if they did not prefer home care (OR=7.7; 95{\%} CI=4.7, 13.5), and if providers judged them to be appropriate for long-term care (OR=29; 95{\%} CI=13, 64). In unstructured interviews, availability of emotional and medical support and privacy emerged as important factors to persons with AIDS considering long-term care. Conclusions:Hospitalized persons with AIDS willingly express their desires for various postdischarge care settings. A majority find long-term care in AIDS facilities acceptable, although they generally prefer home care. Discharge disposition is associated with acceptability, preference, and appropriateness for long-term care.",
keywords = "acceptability of health care, AIDS, discharge planning, long-term care, patient preferences",
author = "McCormick, {Wayne C.} and Thomas Inui and Deyo, {Richard A.} and Wood, {Robert W.}",
year = "1991",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1007/BF02598221",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "524--528",
journal = "Journal of General Internal Medicine",
issn = "0884-8734",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-term care preferences of hospitalized persons with AIDS

AU - McCormick, Wayne C.

AU - Inui, Thomas

AU - Deyo, Richard A.

AU - Wood, Robert W.

PY - 1991/11

Y1 - 1991/11

N2 - Objective:To determine in a cohort of hospitalized persons with AIDS: 1) their preferences for various postdischarge long-term care settings, 2) the postdischarge settings recommended by primary care providers (doctors, nurses, and social workers), and 3) the impact of these views on the resulting discharge dispositions. Design:Prospective cohort study. Setting:Medical wards of five Seattle tertiary care hospitals. Participants:120 consecutive hospitalized persons with AIDS and their primary care providers. Measurements and main results:Although 70 (58%) of the patients found care in an AIDS long-term care facility acceptable, 87 (73%) preferred home care. Thirty-eight (32%) of the cohort were appropriate for long-term care after hospitalization, according to primary care providers. Eleven of the 38 patients deemed appropriate for long-term care were discharged to long-term care settings; among these, three had preferred home care. Likelihood of discharge to long-term care settings increased if patients found it acceptable (OR=7.1; 95% CI=3.2, 15.5), if they did not prefer home care (OR=7.7; 95% CI=4.7, 13.5), and if providers judged them to be appropriate for long-term care (OR=29; 95% CI=13, 64). In unstructured interviews, availability of emotional and medical support and privacy emerged as important factors to persons with AIDS considering long-term care. Conclusions:Hospitalized persons with AIDS willingly express their desires for various postdischarge care settings. A majority find long-term care in AIDS facilities acceptable, although they generally prefer home care. Discharge disposition is associated with acceptability, preference, and appropriateness for long-term care.

AB - Objective:To determine in a cohort of hospitalized persons with AIDS: 1) their preferences for various postdischarge long-term care settings, 2) the postdischarge settings recommended by primary care providers (doctors, nurses, and social workers), and 3) the impact of these views on the resulting discharge dispositions. Design:Prospective cohort study. Setting:Medical wards of five Seattle tertiary care hospitals. Participants:120 consecutive hospitalized persons with AIDS and their primary care providers. Measurements and main results:Although 70 (58%) of the patients found care in an AIDS long-term care facility acceptable, 87 (73%) preferred home care. Thirty-eight (32%) of the cohort were appropriate for long-term care after hospitalization, according to primary care providers. Eleven of the 38 patients deemed appropriate for long-term care were discharged to long-term care settings; among these, three had preferred home care. Likelihood of discharge to long-term care settings increased if patients found it acceptable (OR=7.1; 95% CI=3.2, 15.5), if they did not prefer home care (OR=7.7; 95% CI=4.7, 13.5), and if providers judged them to be appropriate for long-term care (OR=29; 95% CI=13, 64). In unstructured interviews, availability of emotional and medical support and privacy emerged as important factors to persons with AIDS considering long-term care. Conclusions:Hospitalized persons with AIDS willingly express their desires for various postdischarge care settings. A majority find long-term care in AIDS facilities acceptable, although they generally prefer home care. Discharge disposition is associated with acceptability, preference, and appropriateness for long-term care.

KW - acceptability of health care

KW - AIDS

KW - discharge planning

KW - long-term care

KW - patient preferences

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025887523&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025887523&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/BF02598221

DO - 10.1007/BF02598221

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 524

EP - 528

JO - Journal of General Internal Medicine

JF - Journal of General Internal Medicine

SN - 0884-8734

IS - 6

ER -