Long-term effects on diet after proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis

C. Schmidt, Chad A. Wiesenauer, James V. Sitzmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) often report dietary intolerances. Our aim was to assess the effects of proctocolectomy (PC) for UC on dietary intolerances. Methods: A novel disease-specific questionnaire was used. Results: Eighty-seven percent of patients reported 338 dietary intolerances. Of 225 preoperative dietary intolerances, 151 (67%) resolved/improved, 56 (25%) were unchanged, and 18 (8%) were exacerbated after PC. A total of 113 dietary intolerances developed only after PC. The incidence of specific dietary intolerances in patients 10 years and older post-PC was similar to patients younger than 10 years post-PC except for a lower incidence of caffeinated beverage (P = .01) dietary intolerances 10 years or more post-PC. Intestinal symptoms, bowel function, and activities of daily living largely improved after PC. Extraintestinal UC symptoms worsened or failed to improve in 74%. Conclusions: PC for UC frequently improves preoperative dietary intolerances. Some patients, however, are at risk for onset of new dietary intolerances after PC. Studies examining traditional symptoms in UC patients pre-PC and post-PC may be enhanced by examining effects on specific dietary intolerances.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)353-357
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume195
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008

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Ulcerative Colitis
Diet
Incidence
Beverages
Activities of Daily Living

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Dietary intolerance
  • Proctocolectomy
  • Ulcerative colitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Long-term effects on diet after proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis. / Schmidt, C.; Wiesenauer, Chad A.; Sitzmann, James V.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 195, No. 3, 03.2008, p. 353-357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schmidt, C. ; Wiesenauer, Chad A. ; Sitzmann, James V. / Long-term effects on diet after proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2008 ; Vol. 195, No. 3. pp. 353-357.
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