Long term survival after lung transplantation: A single center experience

David Blitzer, Hannah Copeland, David Roe, Chadi Hage, I. Wen Wang, Michael Duncan, Joshua Manghelli, Danyel Gooch, Thomas Wozniak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: There are approximately 2000 lung transplants performed across the United States annually. There is limited data to identify factors predictive of long-term survival. Objective: We evaluated 10-year survivors after lung transplant to determine predictors of long-term survival. Methods: Data were collected from the United Network for Organ Sharing registry database from a single institution. Inclusion criteria were: patients who received a lung transplant between 1989 and 2005. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and survival outcomes were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Three hundred sixty-one patients received a lung transplant between 1989 and 2005, and 77 patients survived at least 10 years (21%). Diagnoses at the time of transplant included: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/emphysema 45 (58.4%), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis 12 (15.6%), alpha 1 anti-trypsin deficiency 6 (7.8%), cystic fibrosis 4 (5.2%), primary pulmonary hypertension 2 (2.6%), and Eisenmenger's syndrome 1 (1.3%). Seventy-four recipients (96.10%) were Caucasian; 46 (59.74%) were female. Age at the time of transplant ranged from 19 to 67 years (mean 50.8; median 52). Forty-two patients (54.5%) were double lung recipients. Survival ranged from 10.0 to 21.9 years (mean 15.5y; median 15.48y). Forty-two (54.5%) subjects are currently alive; the most common causes of death included: chronic rejection (20%), and infection (17.14%). Conclusions: Ten-year survivors were significantly younger, weighed less, and had significantly shorter lengths of hospitalization after transplantation. Bilateral lung transplantation was a significant factor in prolonged survival. Survival also improved with institutional experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Cardiac Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Lung Transplantation
Transplants
Survival
Lung
Survivors
Eisenmenger Complex
Pulmonary Emphysema
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
Cystic Fibrosis
Trypsin
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Registries
Cause of Death
Hospitalization
Transplantation
Databases
Infection

Keywords

  • clinical review
  • transplant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Blitzer, D., Copeland, H., Roe, D., Hage, C., Wang, I. W., Duncan, M., ... Wozniak, T. (Accepted/In press). Long term survival after lung transplantation: A single center experience. Journal of Cardiac Surgery. https://doi.org/10.1111/jocs.14163

Long term survival after lung transplantation : A single center experience. / Blitzer, David; Copeland, Hannah; Roe, David; Hage, Chadi; Wang, I. Wen; Duncan, Michael; Manghelli, Joshua; Gooch, Danyel; Wozniak, Thomas.

In: Journal of Cardiac Surgery, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blitzer, D, Copeland, H, Roe, D, Hage, C, Wang, IW, Duncan, M, Manghelli, J, Gooch, D & Wozniak, T 2019, 'Long term survival after lung transplantation: A single center experience', Journal of Cardiac Surgery. https://doi.org/10.1111/jocs.14163
Blitzer, David ; Copeland, Hannah ; Roe, David ; Hage, Chadi ; Wang, I. Wen ; Duncan, Michael ; Manghelli, Joshua ; Gooch, Danyel ; Wozniak, Thomas. / Long term survival after lung transplantation : A single center experience. In: Journal of Cardiac Surgery. 2019.
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abstract = "Background: There are approximately 2000 lung transplants performed across the United States annually. There is limited data to identify factors predictive of long-term survival. Objective: We evaluated 10-year survivors after lung transplant to determine predictors of long-term survival. Methods: Data were collected from the United Network for Organ Sharing registry database from a single institution. Inclusion criteria were: patients who received a lung transplant between 1989 and 2005. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and survival outcomes were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Three hundred sixty-one patients received a lung transplant between 1989 and 2005, and 77 patients survived at least 10 years (21{\%}). Diagnoses at the time of transplant included: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/emphysema 45 (58.4{\%}), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis 12 (15.6{\%}), alpha 1 anti-trypsin deficiency 6 (7.8{\%}), cystic fibrosis 4 (5.2{\%}), primary pulmonary hypertension 2 (2.6{\%}), and Eisenmenger's syndrome 1 (1.3{\%}). Seventy-four recipients (96.10{\%}) were Caucasian; 46 (59.74{\%}) were female. Age at the time of transplant ranged from 19 to 67 years (mean 50.8; median 52). Forty-two patients (54.5{\%}) were double lung recipients. Survival ranged from 10.0 to 21.9 years (mean 15.5y; median 15.48y). Forty-two (54.5{\%}) subjects are currently alive; the most common causes of death included: chronic rejection (20{\%}), and infection (17.14{\%}). Conclusions: Ten-year survivors were significantly younger, weighed less, and had significantly shorter lengths of hospitalization after transplantation. Bilateral lung transplantation was a significant factor in prolonged survival. Survival also improved with institutional experience.",
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