Longitudinal analysis of the relationship between serum insulin-like growth factor-I and radiographic knee osteoarthritis

Liana Fraenkel, Yuqing Zhang, Stephen Trippel, Timothy E. McAlindon, Michael P. LaValley, Ahmed Assif, Kathryn E. Adams, Stephen R. Evans, David T. Felson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the relation between serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels and both incident and progressive radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in the Framingham Osteoarthritis Study. Design: Subjects had bilateral weight-bearing, anterior-posterior knee radiographs performed in 1983-1985 and again in 1992-1993. IGF-I levels were measured from blood specimens obtained in 1988-1989 by a competitive binding radio-immunoassay (RIA) after separation with octadecasilyl-silica cartridges of serum IGF-I from binding proteins. Participants without baseline radiographic OA [Kellgren and Lawrence grades (K and L) = 0-1] were classified as having incident disease if they had K and L ≤ 2 grades at follow-up. Progressive OA was defined as an increase in K and L score of ≤ 1 in knees with baseline OA (K and L ≤ 2). All analyses were knee-based and sex-specific. We examined IGF-I tertiles in relation to the risk of incident and progressive radiographic OA separately, adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), and baseline K and L score, and used generalized estimating equations to adjust for the correlation between fellow knees. Results: Four hundred and forty- one participants had knee radiographs and serum IGF-I levels measured. No associations were found for serum IGF-I levels and incident [women: OR = 0.9 (0.6-1.7), men OR = 1.2 (0.6-2.6)] or progressive [women OR = 0.9 (0.6-1.6), men OR = 0.9 (0.3-3.0)] radiographic knee OA in either sex. Neither did we observe any association between IGF-I and worsening of individual radiographic features of OA (i.e., osteophyte growth and joint space loss). Conclusion: In summary, this longitudinal study did not demonstrate any association of serum IGF-I and incident or progressive radiographic knee OA. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of IGF-I in OA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)362-367
Number of pages6
JournalOsteoarthritis and Cartilage
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Knee Osteoarthritis
Insulin
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Osteoarthritis
Serum
Knee
Bearings (structural)
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Osteophyte
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins
Competitive Binding
Weight-Bearing
Radio
Immunoassay
Longitudinal Studies
Body Mass Index
Blood
Joints
Silica

Keywords

  • IGF-I
  • Knee
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Radiograph

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Fraenkel, L., Zhang, Y., Trippel, S., McAlindon, T. E., LaValley, M. P., Assif, A., ... Felson, D. T. (1998). Longitudinal analysis of the relationship between serum insulin-like growth factor-I and radiographic knee osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, 6(5), 362-367. https://doi.org/10.1053/joca.1998.0135

Longitudinal analysis of the relationship between serum insulin-like growth factor-I and radiographic knee osteoarthritis. / Fraenkel, Liana; Zhang, Yuqing; Trippel, Stephen; McAlindon, Timothy E.; LaValley, Michael P.; Assif, Ahmed; Adams, Kathryn E.; Evans, Stephen R.; Felson, David T.

In: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, Vol. 6, No. 5, 09.1998, p. 362-367.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fraenkel, L, Zhang, Y, Trippel, S, McAlindon, TE, LaValley, MP, Assif, A, Adams, KE, Evans, SR & Felson, DT 1998, 'Longitudinal analysis of the relationship between serum insulin-like growth factor-I and radiographic knee osteoarthritis', Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, vol. 6, no. 5, pp. 362-367. https://doi.org/10.1053/joca.1998.0135
Fraenkel, Liana ; Zhang, Yuqing ; Trippel, Stephen ; McAlindon, Timothy E. ; LaValley, Michael P. ; Assif, Ahmed ; Adams, Kathryn E. ; Evans, Stephen R. ; Felson, David T. / Longitudinal analysis of the relationship between serum insulin-like growth factor-I and radiographic knee osteoarthritis. In: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage. 1998 ; Vol. 6, No. 5. pp. 362-367.
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abstract = "Objective: To examine the relation between serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels and both incident and progressive radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in the Framingham Osteoarthritis Study. Design: Subjects had bilateral weight-bearing, anterior-posterior knee radiographs performed in 1983-1985 and again in 1992-1993. IGF-I levels were measured from blood specimens obtained in 1988-1989 by a competitive binding radio-immunoassay (RIA) after separation with octadecasilyl-silica cartridges of serum IGF-I from binding proteins. Participants without baseline radiographic OA [Kellgren and Lawrence grades (K and L) = 0-1] were classified as having incident disease if they had K and L ≤ 2 grades at follow-up. Progressive OA was defined as an increase in K and L score of ≤ 1 in knees with baseline OA (K and L ≤ 2). All analyses were knee-based and sex-specific. We examined IGF-I tertiles in relation to the risk of incident and progressive radiographic OA separately, adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), and baseline K and L score, and used generalized estimating equations to adjust for the correlation between fellow knees. Results: Four hundred and forty- one participants had knee radiographs and serum IGF-I levels measured. No associations were found for serum IGF-I levels and incident [women: OR = 0.9 (0.6-1.7), men OR = 1.2 (0.6-2.6)] or progressive [women OR = 0.9 (0.6-1.6), men OR = 0.9 (0.3-3.0)] radiographic knee OA in either sex. Neither did we observe any association between IGF-I and worsening of individual radiographic features of OA (i.e., osteophyte growth and joint space loss). Conclusion: In summary, this longitudinal study did not demonstrate any association of serum IGF-I and incident or progressive radiographic knee OA. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of IGF-I in OA.",
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AU - LaValley, Michael P.

AU - Assif, Ahmed

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N2 - Objective: To examine the relation between serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels and both incident and progressive radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in the Framingham Osteoarthritis Study. Design: Subjects had bilateral weight-bearing, anterior-posterior knee radiographs performed in 1983-1985 and again in 1992-1993. IGF-I levels were measured from blood specimens obtained in 1988-1989 by a competitive binding radio-immunoassay (RIA) after separation with octadecasilyl-silica cartridges of serum IGF-I from binding proteins. Participants without baseline radiographic OA [Kellgren and Lawrence grades (K and L) = 0-1] were classified as having incident disease if they had K and L ≤ 2 grades at follow-up. Progressive OA was defined as an increase in K and L score of ≤ 1 in knees with baseline OA (K and L ≤ 2). All analyses were knee-based and sex-specific. We examined IGF-I tertiles in relation to the risk of incident and progressive radiographic OA separately, adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), and baseline K and L score, and used generalized estimating equations to adjust for the correlation between fellow knees. Results: Four hundred and forty- one participants had knee radiographs and serum IGF-I levels measured. No associations were found for serum IGF-I levels and incident [women: OR = 0.9 (0.6-1.7), men OR = 1.2 (0.6-2.6)] or progressive [women OR = 0.9 (0.6-1.6), men OR = 0.9 (0.3-3.0)] radiographic knee OA in either sex. Neither did we observe any association between IGF-I and worsening of individual radiographic features of OA (i.e., osteophyte growth and joint space loss). Conclusion: In summary, this longitudinal study did not demonstrate any association of serum IGF-I and incident or progressive radiographic knee OA. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of IGF-I in OA.

AB - Objective: To examine the relation between serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels and both incident and progressive radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in the Framingham Osteoarthritis Study. Design: Subjects had bilateral weight-bearing, anterior-posterior knee radiographs performed in 1983-1985 and again in 1992-1993. IGF-I levels were measured from blood specimens obtained in 1988-1989 by a competitive binding radio-immunoassay (RIA) after separation with octadecasilyl-silica cartridges of serum IGF-I from binding proteins. Participants without baseline radiographic OA [Kellgren and Lawrence grades (K and L) = 0-1] were classified as having incident disease if they had K and L ≤ 2 grades at follow-up. Progressive OA was defined as an increase in K and L score of ≤ 1 in knees with baseline OA (K and L ≤ 2). All analyses were knee-based and sex-specific. We examined IGF-I tertiles in relation to the risk of incident and progressive radiographic OA separately, adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), and baseline K and L score, and used generalized estimating equations to adjust for the correlation between fellow knees. Results: Four hundred and forty- one participants had knee radiographs and serum IGF-I levels measured. No associations were found for serum IGF-I levels and incident [women: OR = 0.9 (0.6-1.7), men OR = 1.2 (0.6-2.6)] or progressive [women OR = 0.9 (0.6-1.6), men OR = 0.9 (0.3-3.0)] radiographic knee OA in either sex. Neither did we observe any association between IGF-I and worsening of individual radiographic features of OA (i.e., osteophyte growth and joint space loss). Conclusion: In summary, this longitudinal study did not demonstrate any association of serum IGF-I and incident or progressive radiographic knee OA. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of IGF-I in OA.

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