Longitudinal brain magnetic resonance imaging study of the alcohol-preferring rat. Part II

Effects of voluntary chronic alcohol consumption

Adolf Pfefferbaum, Elfar Adalsteinsson, Rohit Sood, Dirk Mayer, Richard Bell, William McBride, Ting Kai Li, Edith V. Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Tracking the dynamic course of human alcoholism brain pathology can be accomplished only through naturalistic study and without opportunity for experimental manipulation. Development of an animal model of alcohol-induced brain damage, in which animals consume large amounts of alcohol following cycles of alcohol access and deprivation and are examined regularly with neuroimaging methods, would enable hypothesis testing focused on the degree, nature, and factors resulting in alcohol-induced brain damage and the prospects for recovery or relapse. Methods: We report the results of longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the effects of free-choice chronic alcohol intake on the brains of 2 cohorts of selectively bred alcohol-preferring (P) rats. In the companion paper, we described the MRI acquisition and analysis methods, delineation of brain regions, and growth patterns in total brain and selective structures of the control rats in the present study. Both cohorts were studied as adults for about 1 year and consumed high doses of alcohol for most of the study duration. The paradigm involved a 3-bottle choice with 0, 15 (or 20%), and 30% (or 40%) alcohol available in several different exposure schemes: continuous exposure, cycles of 2 weeks on followed by 2 weeks off alcohol, and binge drinking in the dark. Results: Brain structures of the adult P rats in both the alcohol-exposed and the water control conditions showed significant growth, which was attenuated in a few measures in the alcohol-exposed groups. The region with the greatest demonstrable effect was the corpus callosum, measured on midsagittal images. Conclusion: The P rats showed an age-alcohol interaction different from humans, in that normal growth in selective brain regions that continues in adult rats was retarded.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1248-1261
Number of pages14
JournalAlcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2006

Fingerprint

Magnetic resonance
Alcohol Drinking
Rats
Brain
Alcohols
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Imaging techniques
Growth
Animals
Rat control
Binge Drinking
Neuroimaging
Corpus Callosum
Bottles
Pathology
Alcoholism
Animal Models
Recurrence
Recovery

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Brain
  • Corpus Callosum
  • MRI
  • Rat
  • Voluntary Drinking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Toxicology

Cite this

Longitudinal brain magnetic resonance imaging study of the alcohol-preferring rat. Part II : Effects of voluntary chronic alcohol consumption. / Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Sood, Rohit; Mayer, Dirk; Bell, Richard; McBride, William; Li, Ting Kai; Sullivan, Edith V.

In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, Vol. 30, No. 7, 07.2006, p. 1248-1261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pfefferbaum, Adolf ; Adalsteinsson, Elfar ; Sood, Rohit ; Mayer, Dirk ; Bell, Richard ; McBride, William ; Li, Ting Kai ; Sullivan, Edith V. / Longitudinal brain magnetic resonance imaging study of the alcohol-preferring rat. Part II : Effects of voluntary chronic alcohol consumption. In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. 2006 ; Vol. 30, No. 7. pp. 1248-1261.
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