Low circulating levels of dehydroepiandrosterone in histologically advanced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Michael Charlton, Paul Angulo, Naga Chalasani, Ralph Merriman, Kimberly Viker, Phunchai Charatcharoenwitthaya, Schuyler Sanderson, Samer Gawrieh, Anuradha Krishnan, Keith Lindor

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Abstract

The biological basis of variability in histological progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is unknown. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is the most abundant steroid hormone and has been shown to influence sensitivity to oxidative stress, insulin sensitivity, and expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and procollagen messenger RNA. Our aim was to determine whether more histologically advanced NAFLD is associated with low circulating levels of DHEA. Serum samples were obtained prospectively at the time of liver biopsy in 439 patients with NAFLD (78 in an initial and 361 in validation cohorts) and in controls with cholestatic liver disease (n = 44). NAFLD was characterized as mild [simple steatosis or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with fibrosis stage 0-2] or advanced (NASH with fibrosis stage 3-4). Serum levels of sulfated DHEA (DHEA-S) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients with advanced NAFLD had lower plasma levels of DHEA-S than patients with mild NAFLD in both the initial (0.25 ± 0.07 versus 1.1 ± 0.09 μg/mL, P < 0.001) and validation cohorts (0.47 ± 0.06 versus 0.99 ± 0.04 μg/mL, P < 0.001). A "dose effect" of decreasing DHEA-S and incremental fibrosis stage was observed with a mean DHEA-S of 1.03 ± 0.05, 0.96 ± 0.07, 0.83 ± 0.11, 0.66 ± 0.11, and 0.35 ± 0.06 μg/mL for fibrosis stages 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. All patients in both cohorts in the advanced NAFLD group had low DHEA-S levels, with the majority in the hypoadrenal range. The association between DHEA-S and severity of NAFLD persisted after adjusting for age. A relationship between disease/fibrosis severity and DHEA-S levels was not seen in patients with cholestatic liver diseases. Conclusion: More advanced NAFLD, as indicated by the presence of NASH with advanced fibrosis stage, is strongly associated with low circulating DHEA-S. These data provide novel evidence for relative DHEA-S deficiency in patients with histologically advanced NASH.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)484-492
Number of pages9
JournalHepatology
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

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Dehydroepiandrosterone
Fibrosis
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Liver Diseases
PPAR alpha
Procollagen
Serum
Insulin Resistance
Oxidative Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

Cite this

Charlton, M., Angulo, P., Chalasani, N., Merriman, R., Viker, K., Charatcharoenwitthaya, P., ... Lindor, K. (2008). Low circulating levels of dehydroepiandrosterone in histologically advanced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Hepatology, 47(2), 484-492. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.22063

Low circulating levels of dehydroepiandrosterone in histologically advanced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. / Charlton, Michael; Angulo, Paul; Chalasani, Naga; Merriman, Ralph; Viker, Kimberly; Charatcharoenwitthaya, Phunchai; Sanderson, Schuyler; Gawrieh, Samer; Krishnan, Anuradha; Lindor, Keith.

In: Hepatology, Vol. 47, No. 2, 02.2008, p. 484-492.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Charlton, M, Angulo, P, Chalasani, N, Merriman, R, Viker, K, Charatcharoenwitthaya, P, Sanderson, S, Gawrieh, S, Krishnan, A & Lindor, K 2008, 'Low circulating levels of dehydroepiandrosterone in histologically advanced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease', Hepatology, vol. 47, no. 2, pp. 484-492. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.22063
Charlton, Michael ; Angulo, Paul ; Chalasani, Naga ; Merriman, Ralph ; Viker, Kimberly ; Charatcharoenwitthaya, Phunchai ; Sanderson, Schuyler ; Gawrieh, Samer ; Krishnan, Anuradha ; Lindor, Keith. / Low circulating levels of dehydroepiandrosterone in histologically advanced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. In: Hepatology. 2008 ; Vol. 47, No. 2. pp. 484-492.
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AU - Charatcharoenwitthaya, Phunchai

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AU - Gawrieh, Samer

AU - Krishnan, Anuradha

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N2 - The biological basis of variability in histological progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is unknown. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is the most abundant steroid hormone and has been shown to influence sensitivity to oxidative stress, insulin sensitivity, and expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and procollagen messenger RNA. Our aim was to determine whether more histologically advanced NAFLD is associated with low circulating levels of DHEA. Serum samples were obtained prospectively at the time of liver biopsy in 439 patients with NAFLD (78 in an initial and 361 in validation cohorts) and in controls with cholestatic liver disease (n = 44). NAFLD was characterized as mild [simple steatosis or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with fibrosis stage 0-2] or advanced (NASH with fibrosis stage 3-4). Serum levels of sulfated DHEA (DHEA-S) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients with advanced NAFLD had lower plasma levels of DHEA-S than patients with mild NAFLD in both the initial (0.25 ± 0.07 versus 1.1 ± 0.09 μg/mL, P < 0.001) and validation cohorts (0.47 ± 0.06 versus 0.99 ± 0.04 μg/mL, P < 0.001). A "dose effect" of decreasing DHEA-S and incremental fibrosis stage was observed with a mean DHEA-S of 1.03 ± 0.05, 0.96 ± 0.07, 0.83 ± 0.11, 0.66 ± 0.11, and 0.35 ± 0.06 μg/mL for fibrosis stages 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. All patients in both cohorts in the advanced NAFLD group had low DHEA-S levels, with the majority in the hypoadrenal range. The association between DHEA-S and severity of NAFLD persisted after adjusting for age. A relationship between disease/fibrosis severity and DHEA-S levels was not seen in patients with cholestatic liver diseases. Conclusion: More advanced NAFLD, as indicated by the presence of NASH with advanced fibrosis stage, is strongly associated with low circulating DHEA-S. These data provide novel evidence for relative DHEA-S deficiency in patients with histologically advanced NASH.

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