Lung fluid immunoglobulin from HIV-infected subjects has impaired opsonic function against pneumococci

Roger Eagan, Homer L. Twigg, Neil French, Janelisa Musaya, Richard B. Day, Eduard E. Zijlstra, Helen Tolmie, David Wyler, Malcolm E. Molyneux, Stephen B. Gordon

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28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. The incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia is greatly increased among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected subjects, compared with among non-HIV-infected subjects. Lung fluid levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) specific for pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide are not reduced in HIV-infected subjects; therefore, we examined immunoglobulin subtypes and compared lung fluid lgG opsonic function in HIV-infected subjects with that in healthy subjects. Methods. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and serum samples were collected from 23 HIV-infected and 26 uninfected subjects. None of the subjects were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy, and none had received pneumococcal vaccination. Pneumococcal capsule-specific IgG levels in serum and BAL fluid were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and IgG was concentrated from 40 mL of BAL fluid. Opsonization and opsonophagocytosis of pneumococci with serum, BAL fluid, and BAL IgG were compared between HIV-infected subjects and healthy subjects. Results. The effect of type 1 pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide-specific IgG in opsonizing of pneumococci was significantly less using both serum and BAL IgG from HIV-infected subjects, compared with serum and BAL IgG from healthy subjects (mean level, 8.9 fluorescence units [95% confidence interval, 8.1-9.7 fluorescence units] vs. 12.1 fluorescence units [95% confidence interval, 9.7-15.2 fluorescence units]; P = .002 for lung BAL IgG). The opsonophagocytosis of pneumococci observed using BAL IgG from HIV-infected subjects was significantly less than that observed using BAL IgG from healthy subjects (37 fluorescence units per ng of IgG [95% confidence interval, 25-53 fluorescence units per ng of IgG] vs. 127 fluorescence units per ng of IgG [95% confidence interval, 109-145 fluorescence units per ng of IgG]; P < .001). Conclusion. HIV infection is associated with decreased antipneumococcal opsonic function in BAL fluid and serum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1632-1638
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume44
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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    Eagan, R., Twigg, H. L., French, N., Musaya, J., Day, R. B., Zijlstra, E. E., Tolmie, H., Wyler, D., Molyneux, M. E., & Gordon, S. B. (2007). Lung fluid immunoglobulin from HIV-infected subjects has impaired opsonic function against pneumococci. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 44(12), 1632-1638. https://doi.org/10.1086/518133