Lung Growth in Infants and Toddlers Assessed by Multi-slice Computed Tomography

Laxmi Rao, Christina Tiller, Cathy Coates, Risa Kimmel, Kimberly E. Applegate, Janice Granroth-Cook, Cheryl Denski, James Nguyen, Zhangsheng Yu, Eric Hoffman, Robert Tepper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale and Objectives: Postnatal lung growth and development have primarily been evaluated from a very limited number of autopsied lungs, but it remains unclear whether alveolarization of the lung is complete during infancy and whether the conducting airways grow proportionately. The purpose of this study was to evaluate lung growth and development in vivo in infants and toddlers using multislice computed tomography. Materials and Methods: Thirty-eight subjects (14 male, 24 female) aged 17 to 142 weeks underwent low-dose volumetric high-resolution computed tomographic imaging at an inflation pressure of 20 cm H2O during an induced respiratory pause. Lung volume and weight were determined, as well as airway dimensions (inner and outer area and wall area) for the trachea and the next three to four generations. Results: Lung volume, air volume, and tissue volume increased linearly with body length. The air and tissue components of the lung parenchyma increased at a constant rate with each other. In addition, airway caliber decreased with increasing generation from the trachea into each lobe. Airway caliber was also correlated with body length; however, there was no interaction effect between airway generation and body length on transformed airway size. Conclusions: In vivo assessment suggests that the growth of the lung parenchyma in infants and toddlers occurred with a constant relationship between air volume and lung tissue, which is consistent with lung growth occurring primarily by the addition of alveoli rather than the expansion of alveoli. In addition, the central conducting airways grow proportionately in infants and toddlers. This information may be important for evaluating subjects with arrested lung development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1128-1135
Number of pages8
JournalAcademic Radiology
Volume17
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

Fingerprint

Tomography
Lung
Growth
Air
Trachea
Growth and Development
Multidetector Computed Tomography
Economic Inflation
Pressure
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Airway size
  • Lung parenchyma
  • Lung volume

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Rao, L., Tiller, C., Coates, C., Kimmel, R., Applegate, K. E., Granroth-Cook, J., ... Tepper, R. (2010). Lung Growth in Infants and Toddlers Assessed by Multi-slice Computed Tomography. Academic Radiology, 17(9), 1128-1135. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2010.04.012

Lung Growth in Infants and Toddlers Assessed by Multi-slice Computed Tomography. / Rao, Laxmi; Tiller, Christina; Coates, Cathy; Kimmel, Risa; Applegate, Kimberly E.; Granroth-Cook, Janice; Denski, Cheryl; Nguyen, James; Yu, Zhangsheng; Hoffman, Eric; Tepper, Robert.

In: Academic Radiology, Vol. 17, No. 9, 09.2010, p. 1128-1135.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rao, L, Tiller, C, Coates, C, Kimmel, R, Applegate, KE, Granroth-Cook, J, Denski, C, Nguyen, J, Yu, Z, Hoffman, E & Tepper, R 2010, 'Lung Growth in Infants and Toddlers Assessed by Multi-slice Computed Tomography', Academic Radiology, vol. 17, no. 9, pp. 1128-1135. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2010.04.012
Rao L, Tiller C, Coates C, Kimmel R, Applegate KE, Granroth-Cook J et al. Lung Growth in Infants and Toddlers Assessed by Multi-slice Computed Tomography. Academic Radiology. 2010 Sep;17(9):1128-1135. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2010.04.012
Rao, Laxmi ; Tiller, Christina ; Coates, Cathy ; Kimmel, Risa ; Applegate, Kimberly E. ; Granroth-Cook, Janice ; Denski, Cheryl ; Nguyen, James ; Yu, Zhangsheng ; Hoffman, Eric ; Tepper, Robert. / Lung Growth in Infants and Toddlers Assessed by Multi-slice Computed Tomography. In: Academic Radiology. 2010 ; Vol. 17, No. 9. pp. 1128-1135.
@article{2aa5ddc1b28440a4810696453a04f259,
title = "Lung Growth in Infants and Toddlers Assessed by Multi-slice Computed Tomography",
abstract = "Rationale and Objectives: Postnatal lung growth and development have primarily been evaluated from a very limited number of autopsied lungs, but it remains unclear whether alveolarization of the lung is complete during infancy and whether the conducting airways grow proportionately. The purpose of this study was to evaluate lung growth and development in vivo in infants and toddlers using multislice computed tomography. Materials and Methods: Thirty-eight subjects (14 male, 24 female) aged 17 to 142 weeks underwent low-dose volumetric high-resolution computed tomographic imaging at an inflation pressure of 20 cm H2O during an induced respiratory pause. Lung volume and weight were determined, as well as airway dimensions (inner and outer area and wall area) for the trachea and the next three to four generations. Results: Lung volume, air volume, and tissue volume increased linearly with body length. The air and tissue components of the lung parenchyma increased at a constant rate with each other. In addition, airway caliber decreased with increasing generation from the trachea into each lobe. Airway caliber was also correlated with body length; however, there was no interaction effect between airway generation and body length on transformed airway size. Conclusions: In vivo assessment suggests that the growth of the lung parenchyma in infants and toddlers occurred with a constant relationship between air volume and lung tissue, which is consistent with lung growth occurring primarily by the addition of alveoli rather than the expansion of alveoli. In addition, the central conducting airways grow proportionately in infants and toddlers. This information may be important for evaluating subjects with arrested lung development.",
keywords = "Airway size, Lung parenchyma, Lung volume",
author = "Laxmi Rao and Christina Tiller and Cathy Coates and Risa Kimmel and Applegate, {Kimberly E.} and Janice Granroth-Cook and Cheryl Denski and James Nguyen and Zhangsheng Yu and Eric Hoffman and Robert Tepper",
year = "2010",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.acra.2010.04.012",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "1128--1135",
journal = "Academic Radiology",
issn = "1076-6332",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lung Growth in Infants and Toddlers Assessed by Multi-slice Computed Tomography

AU - Rao, Laxmi

AU - Tiller, Christina

AU - Coates, Cathy

AU - Kimmel, Risa

AU - Applegate, Kimberly E.

AU - Granroth-Cook, Janice

AU - Denski, Cheryl

AU - Nguyen, James

AU - Yu, Zhangsheng

AU - Hoffman, Eric

AU - Tepper, Robert

PY - 2010/9

Y1 - 2010/9

N2 - Rationale and Objectives: Postnatal lung growth and development have primarily been evaluated from a very limited number of autopsied lungs, but it remains unclear whether alveolarization of the lung is complete during infancy and whether the conducting airways grow proportionately. The purpose of this study was to evaluate lung growth and development in vivo in infants and toddlers using multislice computed tomography. Materials and Methods: Thirty-eight subjects (14 male, 24 female) aged 17 to 142 weeks underwent low-dose volumetric high-resolution computed tomographic imaging at an inflation pressure of 20 cm H2O during an induced respiratory pause. Lung volume and weight were determined, as well as airway dimensions (inner and outer area and wall area) for the trachea and the next three to four generations. Results: Lung volume, air volume, and tissue volume increased linearly with body length. The air and tissue components of the lung parenchyma increased at a constant rate with each other. In addition, airway caliber decreased with increasing generation from the trachea into each lobe. Airway caliber was also correlated with body length; however, there was no interaction effect between airway generation and body length on transformed airway size. Conclusions: In vivo assessment suggests that the growth of the lung parenchyma in infants and toddlers occurred with a constant relationship between air volume and lung tissue, which is consistent with lung growth occurring primarily by the addition of alveoli rather than the expansion of alveoli. In addition, the central conducting airways grow proportionately in infants and toddlers. This information may be important for evaluating subjects with arrested lung development.

AB - Rationale and Objectives: Postnatal lung growth and development have primarily been evaluated from a very limited number of autopsied lungs, but it remains unclear whether alveolarization of the lung is complete during infancy and whether the conducting airways grow proportionately. The purpose of this study was to evaluate lung growth and development in vivo in infants and toddlers using multislice computed tomography. Materials and Methods: Thirty-eight subjects (14 male, 24 female) aged 17 to 142 weeks underwent low-dose volumetric high-resolution computed tomographic imaging at an inflation pressure of 20 cm H2O during an induced respiratory pause. Lung volume and weight were determined, as well as airway dimensions (inner and outer area and wall area) for the trachea and the next three to four generations. Results: Lung volume, air volume, and tissue volume increased linearly with body length. The air and tissue components of the lung parenchyma increased at a constant rate with each other. In addition, airway caliber decreased with increasing generation from the trachea into each lobe. Airway caliber was also correlated with body length; however, there was no interaction effect between airway generation and body length on transformed airway size. Conclusions: In vivo assessment suggests that the growth of the lung parenchyma in infants and toddlers occurred with a constant relationship between air volume and lung tissue, which is consistent with lung growth occurring primarily by the addition of alveoli rather than the expansion of alveoli. In addition, the central conducting airways grow proportionately in infants and toddlers. This information may be important for evaluating subjects with arrested lung development.

KW - Airway size

KW - Lung parenchyma

KW - Lung volume

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77955422107&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77955422107&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.acra.2010.04.012

DO - 10.1016/j.acra.2010.04.012

M3 - Article

C2 - 20542449

AN - SCOPUS:77955422107

VL - 17

SP - 1128

EP - 1135

JO - Academic Radiology

JF - Academic Radiology

SN - 1076-6332

IS - 9

ER -