Lung transplantation: Opportunities for research and clinical advancement

David S. Wilkes, Thomas M. Egan, Herbert Y. Reynolds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lung transplantation is the only definitive therapy for many forms of end-stage lung diseases. However, the success of lung transplantation is limited by many factors: (1) Too few lungs available for transplantation due to limited donors or injury to the donor lung; (2) current methods of preservation of excised lungs do not allow extended periods of time between procurement and implantation; (3) acute graft failure is more common with lungs than other solid organs, thus contributing to poorer short-term survival after lung transplant compared with that for recipients of other organs; (4) lung transplant recipients are particularly vulnerable to pulmonary infections; and (5) chronic allograft dysfunction, manifest by bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, is frequent and limits long-term survival. Scientific advances may provide significant improvements in the outcome of lung transplantation. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a working group of investigators on June 14-15, 2004, in Bethesda, Maryland, to identify opportunities for scientific advancement in lung transplantation, including basic and clinical research. This workshop provides a framework to identify critical issues related to clinical lung transplantation, and to delineate important areas for productive scientific investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)944-955
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume172
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lung Transplantation
Lung
Research
Tissue Donors
Bronchiolitis Obliterans
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.)
Transplants
Survival
Lung Diseases
Allografts
Research Personnel
Education
Wounds and Injuries
Infection

Keywords

  • Allograft dysfunction
  • Infection
  • Ischemia-reperfusion injury
  • Lung transplantation
  • Obliterative bronchiolitis
  • Rejection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Lung transplantation : Opportunities for research and clinical advancement. / Wilkes, David S.; Egan, Thomas M.; Reynolds, Herbert Y.

In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 172, No. 8, 15.10.2005, p. 944-955.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wilkes, David S. ; Egan, Thomas M. ; Reynolds, Herbert Y. / Lung transplantation : Opportunities for research and clinical advancement. In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 172, No. 8. pp. 944-955.
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