Magnesium intake and mortality due to liver diseases: Results from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Cohort

Lijun Wu, Xiangzhu Zhu, Lei Fan, Edmond K. Kabagambe, Yiqing Song, Menghua Tao, Xiaosong Zhong, Lifang Hou, Martha J. Shrubsole, Jie Liu, Qi Dai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

People with fatty liver disease are at high risk of magnesium deficiency. Meanwhile, low magnesium status is linked to both chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. However, no study has investigated the association between intake of magnesium and risk of mortality due to liver diseases. We evaluated the association between total magnesium intake and mortality due to liver diseases in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Study (NHANES III) cohort, which included 13,504 participants who completed liver ultrasound examination for hepatic steatosis. Overall magnesium intake was associated with a reduced risk of mortality due to liver disease at borderline significance (P = 0.05). In fully-adjusted analyses, every 100 mg increase in intake of magnesium was associated with a 49% reduction in the risk for mortality due to liver diseases. Although interactions between magnesium intake and alcohol use and hepatic steatosis at baseline were not significant (P > 0.05), inverse associations between magnesium intake and liver disease mortality were stronger among alcohol drinkers and those with hepatic steatosis. Our findings suggest higher intakes of magnesium may be associated with a reduced risk of mortality due to liver disease particularly among alcohol drinkers and those with hepatic steatosis. Further studies are warranted to confirm the findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number17913
JournalScientific Reports
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

Nutrition Surveys
Magnesium
Liver Diseases
Mortality
Liver
Alcohols
Magnesium Deficiency
Fatty Liver
Risk Reduction Behavior
Insulin Resistance
Inflammation
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Magnesium intake and mortality due to liver diseases : Results from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Cohort. / Wu, Lijun; Zhu, Xiangzhu; Fan, Lei; Kabagambe, Edmond K.; Song, Yiqing; Tao, Menghua; Zhong, Xiaosong; Hou, Lifang; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Liu, Jie; Dai, Qi.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, No. 1, 17913, 01.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wu, Lijun ; Zhu, Xiangzhu ; Fan, Lei ; Kabagambe, Edmond K. ; Song, Yiqing ; Tao, Menghua ; Zhong, Xiaosong ; Hou, Lifang ; Shrubsole, Martha J. ; Liu, Jie ; Dai, Qi. / Magnesium intake and mortality due to liver diseases : Results from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Cohort. In: Scientific Reports. 2017 ; Vol. 7, No. 1.
@article{95284a168cec4c2f868d761b641f235d,
title = "Magnesium intake and mortality due to liver diseases: Results from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Cohort",
abstract = "People with fatty liver disease are at high risk of magnesium deficiency. Meanwhile, low magnesium status is linked to both chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. However, no study has investigated the association between intake of magnesium and risk of mortality due to liver diseases. We evaluated the association between total magnesium intake and mortality due to liver diseases in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Study (NHANES III) cohort, which included 13,504 participants who completed liver ultrasound examination for hepatic steatosis. Overall magnesium intake was associated with a reduced risk of mortality due to liver disease at borderline significance (P = 0.05). In fully-adjusted analyses, every 100 mg increase in intake of magnesium was associated with a 49{\%} reduction in the risk for mortality due to liver diseases. Although interactions between magnesium intake and alcohol use and hepatic steatosis at baseline were not significant (P > 0.05), inverse associations between magnesium intake and liver disease mortality were stronger among alcohol drinkers and those with hepatic steatosis. Our findings suggest higher intakes of magnesium may be associated with a reduced risk of mortality due to liver disease particularly among alcohol drinkers and those with hepatic steatosis. Further studies are warranted to confirm the findings.",
author = "Lijun Wu and Xiangzhu Zhu and Lei Fan and Kabagambe, {Edmond K.} and Yiqing Song and Menghua Tao and Xiaosong Zhong and Lifang Hou and Shrubsole, {Martha J.} and Jie Liu and Qi Dai",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/s41598-017-18076-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Magnesium intake and mortality due to liver diseases

T2 - Results from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Cohort

AU - Wu, Lijun

AU - Zhu, Xiangzhu

AU - Fan, Lei

AU - Kabagambe, Edmond K.

AU - Song, Yiqing

AU - Tao, Menghua

AU - Zhong, Xiaosong

AU - Hou, Lifang

AU - Shrubsole, Martha J.

AU - Liu, Jie

AU - Dai, Qi

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - People with fatty liver disease are at high risk of magnesium deficiency. Meanwhile, low magnesium status is linked to both chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. However, no study has investigated the association between intake of magnesium and risk of mortality due to liver diseases. We evaluated the association between total magnesium intake and mortality due to liver diseases in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Study (NHANES III) cohort, which included 13,504 participants who completed liver ultrasound examination for hepatic steatosis. Overall magnesium intake was associated with a reduced risk of mortality due to liver disease at borderline significance (P = 0.05). In fully-adjusted analyses, every 100 mg increase in intake of magnesium was associated with a 49% reduction in the risk for mortality due to liver diseases. Although interactions between magnesium intake and alcohol use and hepatic steatosis at baseline were not significant (P > 0.05), inverse associations between magnesium intake and liver disease mortality were stronger among alcohol drinkers and those with hepatic steatosis. Our findings suggest higher intakes of magnesium may be associated with a reduced risk of mortality due to liver disease particularly among alcohol drinkers and those with hepatic steatosis. Further studies are warranted to confirm the findings.

AB - People with fatty liver disease are at high risk of magnesium deficiency. Meanwhile, low magnesium status is linked to both chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. However, no study has investigated the association between intake of magnesium and risk of mortality due to liver diseases. We evaluated the association between total magnesium intake and mortality due to liver diseases in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Study (NHANES III) cohort, which included 13,504 participants who completed liver ultrasound examination for hepatic steatosis. Overall magnesium intake was associated with a reduced risk of mortality due to liver disease at borderline significance (P = 0.05). In fully-adjusted analyses, every 100 mg increase in intake of magnesium was associated with a 49% reduction in the risk for mortality due to liver diseases. Although interactions between magnesium intake and alcohol use and hepatic steatosis at baseline were not significant (P > 0.05), inverse associations between magnesium intake and liver disease mortality were stronger among alcohol drinkers and those with hepatic steatosis. Our findings suggest higher intakes of magnesium may be associated with a reduced risk of mortality due to liver disease particularly among alcohol drinkers and those with hepatic steatosis. Further studies are warranted to confirm the findings.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85038637145&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85038637145&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/s41598-017-18076-5

DO - 10.1038/s41598-017-18076-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 29263344

AN - SCOPUS:85038637145

VL - 7

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

IS - 1

M1 - 17913

ER -