Management of cervical spine injuries in young children: Lessons learned: Report of 2 cases

Jodi L. Smith, Laurie L. Ackerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous studies have shown that the correct use of car safety seats can protect infants and children from vehicular injury. Although child passenger devices are increasingly used in the US, motor vehicle crashes continue to be the leading cause of death and acquired disability in infants and children younger than 14 years of age. These events are likely related, at least in part, to the high percentage of children who are unrestrained or improperly restrained. The authors present 2 cases of severe cervical spine trauma in young children restrained in car safety seats during a motor vehicle crash: 1) a previously healthy 14-month-old girl who was improperly restrained in a forward-facing booster seat secured to the vehicle by a lap belt, and 2) a previously healthy 30-month-old girl who was a rear seat passenger restrained in a car safety seat. This study points out the unique challenges encountered in treating cervical spine injuries in infants and young children, as well as the lessons learned, and emphasizes the significance of continuing efforts to increase family and public awareness regarding the importance of appropriate child safety seat selection and use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-73
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

Keywords

  • Booster seat
  • Cervical spine trauma
  • Child safety seat
  • Motor vehicle crash
  • Pediatric patient

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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