Measurement of strain and strain rate developed by jumping exercises in vivo in humans

C. Milgrom, A. Finestone, N. Benjoyan, A. Simkin, I. Ekenman, David Burr

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Impulsive loading through jumping does not generate significantly higher peak tensile or compressive strains than those developed during running However, jumping creates shear strains that are 3-6x higher than compressive and tensile strains. Training programs that eliminate continuous high-impact activities are likely to result in decreased stress fracture incidence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSouthern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings
PublisherIEEE
Pages108
Number of pages1
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1998 17th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - San Antonio, TX, USA
Duration: Feb 6 1998Feb 8 1998

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1998 17th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference
CitySan Antonio, TX, USA
Period2/6/982/8/98

Fingerprint

Tensile strain
Shear strain
Strain rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Milgrom, C., Finestone, A., Benjoyan, N., Simkin, A., Ekenman, I., & Burr, D. (1998). Measurement of strain and strain rate developed by jumping exercises in vivo in humans. In Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings (pp. 108). IEEE.

Measurement of strain and strain rate developed by jumping exercises in vivo in humans. / Milgrom, C.; Finestone, A.; Benjoyan, N.; Simkin, A.; Ekenman, I.; Burr, David.

Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings. IEEE, 1998. p. 108.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Milgrom, C, Finestone, A, Benjoyan, N, Simkin, A, Ekenman, I & Burr, D 1998, Measurement of strain and strain rate developed by jumping exercises in vivo in humans. in Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings. IEEE, pp. 108, Proceedings of the 1998 17th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, San Antonio, TX, USA, 2/6/98.
Milgrom C, Finestone A, Benjoyan N, Simkin A, Ekenman I, Burr D. Measurement of strain and strain rate developed by jumping exercises in vivo in humans. In Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings. IEEE. 1998. p. 108
Milgrom, C. ; Finestone, A. ; Benjoyan, N. ; Simkin, A. ; Ekenman, I. ; Burr, David. / Measurement of strain and strain rate developed by jumping exercises in vivo in humans. Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings. IEEE, 1998. pp. 108
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