Measuring patient satisfaction for quality improvement

Lisa E. Harris, Ralph W. Swindle, Simon M. Mungai, Morris Weinberger, William M. Tierney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND. Surveys used for health plan quality reporting are generally administered annually to health plan enrollees to assess satisfaction with both the health plan and health care services. Therefore, surveys may lack sensitivity to measure the effects of patient-focused, quality improvement initiatives that could demonstrate results in a shorter time period. OBJECTIVES. We describe the development and testing of a multidimensional, visit-specific measure of satisfaction with primary care that may be used in quality improvement. METHODS. Conducted in five adult and pediatric primary care sites serving a commercial, largely managed-care population, the survey includes the Medical Outcomes Study Visit-Specific Questionnaire, the American Board of Internal Medicine Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire, and locally developed items. We assessed the instrument's reliability, validity, and utility for quality improvement. RESULTS. For both adult and pediatric samples, three factors emerged: satisfaction with the provider, satisfaction with access, and satisfaction with the office. Satisfaction with the provider and with the office were independently correlated with overall satisfaction in both samples; satisfaction with access was significantly correlated with overall satisfaction only for adults. For adults, patients who disenrolled from the health plan were less satisfied with the office compared with patients who remained with the health plan. Finally, for adults, we detected significant differences across practice sites in terms of satisfaction with office and access; for children, there were intersite differences in terms of satisfaction with provider, office, and access. CONCLUSIONS. We have support for the reliability and validity of this instrument that has identified differences in satisfaction between practice sites that may be used for quality improvement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1207-1213
Number of pages7
JournalMedical Care
Volume37
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Quality Improvement
Patient Satisfaction
health
Health
Reproducibility of Results
Primary Health Care
Pediatrics
Managed Care Programs
questionnaire
Internal Medicine
Health Surveys
health care services
Health Services
managed care
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Delivery of Health Care
medicine

Keywords

  • Patient satisfaction
  • Patient-centered care
  • Quality improvement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Harris, L. E., Swindle, R. W., Mungai, S. M., Weinberger, M., & Tierney, W. M. (1999). Measuring patient satisfaction for quality improvement. Medical Care, 37(12), 1207-1213. https://doi.org/10.1097/00005650-199912000-00004

Measuring patient satisfaction for quality improvement. / Harris, Lisa E.; Swindle, Ralph W.; Mungai, Simon M.; Weinberger, Morris; Tierney, William M.

In: Medical Care, Vol. 37, No. 12, 1999, p. 1207-1213.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harris, LE, Swindle, RW, Mungai, SM, Weinberger, M & Tierney, WM 1999, 'Measuring patient satisfaction for quality improvement', Medical Care, vol. 37, no. 12, pp. 1207-1213. https://doi.org/10.1097/00005650-199912000-00004
Harris LE, Swindle RW, Mungai SM, Weinberger M, Tierney WM. Measuring patient satisfaction for quality improvement. Medical Care. 1999;37(12):1207-1213. https://doi.org/10.1097/00005650-199912000-00004
Harris, Lisa E. ; Swindle, Ralph W. ; Mungai, Simon M. ; Weinberger, Morris ; Tierney, William M. / Measuring patient satisfaction for quality improvement. In: Medical Care. 1999 ; Vol. 37, No. 12. pp. 1207-1213.
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