Mechanical and physicochemical regulation of the action of insulin-like growth factor-I on articular cartilage

Lawrence J. Bonassar, Alan J. Grodzinsky, Aneetha Srinivasan, Salomon G. Davila, Stephen B. Trippel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

83 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The development and maintenance of healthy joints is a complex process involving many physical and biological stimuli. This study investigates the interaction between insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and static mechanical compression in the regulation of articular cartilage metabolism. Bovine cartilage explants were treated with concentrations of IGF-I from 0 to 300 ng/ml in the presence or absence of 0-50% static compression, and the transient and steady-state incorporation of [3H]proline and [35S]sulfate into matrix components were measured. In parallel studies, cartilage explants were treated with 0-300 ng/ml IGF-I at media pH ranging from 6.4 to 7.2 and the steady-state incorporation of [3H]proline and [35S]sulfate was measured. The effect of 50% static compression on IGF-I transport was determined by measuring the uptake of 125I-labeled IGF-I into cartilage explants. Static compression decreased both [3H]proline and [35S]sulfate incorporation in a dose-dependent manner in the presence or absence of IGF-I. IGF-I increased [3H]proline and [35S]sulfate incorporation in a dose- dependent manner in the presence or absence of compression, but the anabolic effect of the growth factor was lessened when the tissue was compressed by 50%. The response of cartilage explants to IGF-I was similarly lessened in unstrained tissue cultured in media at pH 6.4, a condition which results in a similar intratissue pH to that when cartilage is compressed by 50%. The characteristic time constant (τ) for IGF-I stimulation of cartilage explants was approximately 24 h, while τ for inhibition of biosynthesis by static compression was approximately 2 h. Samples which were both compressed and treated with IGF-I demonstrated an initial decrease in biosynthetic activity at 2 h, followed by an increase at 24 h. Static compression did not alter τ for 125I-labeled IGF-I transport into cartilage but decreased the concentration of 125I-labeled IGF-I in the tissue at equilibrium. (C) 2000 Academic Press.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-63
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Biochemistry and Biophysics
Volume379
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2000

Fingerprint

Cartilage
Articular Cartilage
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Proline
Sulfates
Tissue
Anabolic Agents
Biosynthesis
Metabolism
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Joints
Maintenance

Keywords

  • Cartilage biomechanics
  • Chondrocyte metabolism
  • IGF-I
  • Matrix assembly
  • Physical stimuli

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Mechanical and physicochemical regulation of the action of insulin-like growth factor-I on articular cartilage. / Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Srinivasan, Aneetha; Davila, Salomon G.; Trippel, Stephen B.

In: Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Vol. 379, No. 1, 01.07.2000, p. 57-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bonassar, Lawrence J. ; Grodzinsky, Alan J. ; Srinivasan, Aneetha ; Davila, Salomon G. ; Trippel, Stephen B. / Mechanical and physicochemical regulation of the action of insulin-like growth factor-I on articular cartilage. In: Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics. 2000 ; Vol. 379, No. 1. pp. 57-63.
@article{84b1f64ee7b24a6e82ab9eb20fa9eebb,
title = "Mechanical and physicochemical regulation of the action of insulin-like growth factor-I on articular cartilage",
abstract = "The development and maintenance of healthy joints is a complex process involving many physical and biological stimuli. This study investigates the interaction between insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and static mechanical compression in the regulation of articular cartilage metabolism. Bovine cartilage explants were treated with concentrations of IGF-I from 0 to 300 ng/ml in the presence or absence of 0-50{\%} static compression, and the transient and steady-state incorporation of [3H]proline and [35S]sulfate into matrix components were measured. In parallel studies, cartilage explants were treated with 0-300 ng/ml IGF-I at media pH ranging from 6.4 to 7.2 and the steady-state incorporation of [3H]proline and [35S]sulfate was measured. The effect of 50{\%} static compression on IGF-I transport was determined by measuring the uptake of 125I-labeled IGF-I into cartilage explants. Static compression decreased both [3H]proline and [35S]sulfate incorporation in a dose-dependent manner in the presence or absence of IGF-I. IGF-I increased [3H]proline and [35S]sulfate incorporation in a dose- dependent manner in the presence or absence of compression, but the anabolic effect of the growth factor was lessened when the tissue was compressed by 50{\%}. The response of cartilage explants to IGF-I was similarly lessened in unstrained tissue cultured in media at pH 6.4, a condition which results in a similar intratissue pH to that when cartilage is compressed by 50{\%}. The characteristic time constant (τ) for IGF-I stimulation of cartilage explants was approximately 24 h, while τ for inhibition of biosynthesis by static compression was approximately 2 h. Samples which were both compressed and treated with IGF-I demonstrated an initial decrease in biosynthetic activity at 2 h, followed by an increase at 24 h. Static compression did not alter τ for 125I-labeled IGF-I transport into cartilage but decreased the concentration of 125I-labeled IGF-I in the tissue at equilibrium. (C) 2000 Academic Press.",
keywords = "Cartilage biomechanics, Chondrocyte metabolism, IGF-I, Matrix assembly, Physical stimuli",
author = "Bonassar, {Lawrence J.} and Grodzinsky, {Alan J.} and Aneetha Srinivasan and Davila, {Salomon G.} and Trippel, {Stephen B.}",
year = "2000",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1006/abbi.2000.1820",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "379",
pages = "57--63",
journal = "Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics",
issn = "0003-9861",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mechanical and physicochemical regulation of the action of insulin-like growth factor-I on articular cartilage

AU - Bonassar, Lawrence J.

AU - Grodzinsky, Alan J.

AU - Srinivasan, Aneetha

AU - Davila, Salomon G.

AU - Trippel, Stephen B.

PY - 2000/7/1

Y1 - 2000/7/1

N2 - The development and maintenance of healthy joints is a complex process involving many physical and biological stimuli. This study investigates the interaction between insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and static mechanical compression in the regulation of articular cartilage metabolism. Bovine cartilage explants were treated with concentrations of IGF-I from 0 to 300 ng/ml in the presence or absence of 0-50% static compression, and the transient and steady-state incorporation of [3H]proline and [35S]sulfate into matrix components were measured. In parallel studies, cartilage explants were treated with 0-300 ng/ml IGF-I at media pH ranging from 6.4 to 7.2 and the steady-state incorporation of [3H]proline and [35S]sulfate was measured. The effect of 50% static compression on IGF-I transport was determined by measuring the uptake of 125I-labeled IGF-I into cartilage explants. Static compression decreased both [3H]proline and [35S]sulfate incorporation in a dose-dependent manner in the presence or absence of IGF-I. IGF-I increased [3H]proline and [35S]sulfate incorporation in a dose- dependent manner in the presence or absence of compression, but the anabolic effect of the growth factor was lessened when the tissue was compressed by 50%. The response of cartilage explants to IGF-I was similarly lessened in unstrained tissue cultured in media at pH 6.4, a condition which results in a similar intratissue pH to that when cartilage is compressed by 50%. The characteristic time constant (τ) for IGF-I stimulation of cartilage explants was approximately 24 h, while τ for inhibition of biosynthesis by static compression was approximately 2 h. Samples which were both compressed and treated with IGF-I demonstrated an initial decrease in biosynthetic activity at 2 h, followed by an increase at 24 h. Static compression did not alter τ for 125I-labeled IGF-I transport into cartilage but decreased the concentration of 125I-labeled IGF-I in the tissue at equilibrium. (C) 2000 Academic Press.

AB - The development and maintenance of healthy joints is a complex process involving many physical and biological stimuli. This study investigates the interaction between insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and static mechanical compression in the regulation of articular cartilage metabolism. Bovine cartilage explants were treated with concentrations of IGF-I from 0 to 300 ng/ml in the presence or absence of 0-50% static compression, and the transient and steady-state incorporation of [3H]proline and [35S]sulfate into matrix components were measured. In parallel studies, cartilage explants were treated with 0-300 ng/ml IGF-I at media pH ranging from 6.4 to 7.2 and the steady-state incorporation of [3H]proline and [35S]sulfate was measured. The effect of 50% static compression on IGF-I transport was determined by measuring the uptake of 125I-labeled IGF-I into cartilage explants. Static compression decreased both [3H]proline and [35S]sulfate incorporation in a dose-dependent manner in the presence or absence of IGF-I. IGF-I increased [3H]proline and [35S]sulfate incorporation in a dose- dependent manner in the presence or absence of compression, but the anabolic effect of the growth factor was lessened when the tissue was compressed by 50%. The response of cartilage explants to IGF-I was similarly lessened in unstrained tissue cultured in media at pH 6.4, a condition which results in a similar intratissue pH to that when cartilage is compressed by 50%. The characteristic time constant (τ) for IGF-I stimulation of cartilage explants was approximately 24 h, while τ for inhibition of biosynthesis by static compression was approximately 2 h. Samples which were both compressed and treated with IGF-I demonstrated an initial decrease in biosynthetic activity at 2 h, followed by an increase at 24 h. Static compression did not alter τ for 125I-labeled IGF-I transport into cartilage but decreased the concentration of 125I-labeled IGF-I in the tissue at equilibrium. (C) 2000 Academic Press.

KW - Cartilage biomechanics

KW - Chondrocyte metabolism

KW - IGF-I

KW - Matrix assembly

KW - Physical stimuli

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034235943&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034235943&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1006/abbi.2000.1820

DO - 10.1006/abbi.2000.1820

M3 - Article

C2 - 10864441

AN - SCOPUS:0034235943

VL - 379

SP - 57

EP - 63

JO - Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics

JF - Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics

SN - 0003-9861

IS - 1

ER -