Mechanical strength of bone cement with and without adjuvant screw fixation

Ryan Keyser, Robert Migliori, Tessa Morgan, Steven R. Anton, Kevin M. Fariholt, R. Meneghini

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Knee replacement surgery is a challenging, invasive procedure, so it is prudent that reliable components are used to minimize the likelihood of implant failure and subsequent risky, post-operation corrections. Each artificial component is adhered to a bone interface by composite acrylic-based cement. It is theorized that the structural integrity and, by extension, longevity of bone cement used to fill voids in knee replacement surgery is augmented by adjuvant screws embedded in the cement and anchored in bone, analogous to rebar-reinforced concrete.While the screw fixation method has exhibited positive results in arthroplasty patients, no conclusive evidence has been produced demonstrating its value over cement without screw fixation. It was the purpose of this research to examine which, if either, method is more effective. Porous polyurethane blocks were used to emulate human bones, in which uniform defects were generated and filled with bone cement in two cases, with and without the addition of screws. To test their mechanical properties, the specimens were loaded in compression by a material testing machine to mimic the forces created by the body, with focus on micro-motion of the cement. Additionally, nondestructive damage detection techniques were performed during fatigue testing by high frequency interrogation using piezoceramic actuators and sensors. Damage detection and classification algorithms were explored from attained data.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationConference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series
Pages19-33
Number of pages15
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Event31st International Modal Analysis Conference on Structural Dynamics, IMAC 2013 - Garden Grove, CA, United States
Duration: Feb 11 2013Feb 14 2013

Other

Other31st International Modal Analysis Conference on Structural Dynamics, IMAC 2013
CountryUnited States
CityGarden Grove, CA
Period2/11/132/14/13

Fingerprint

Bone cement
Strength of materials
Knee prostheses
Bone
Damage detection
Surgery
Cements
Arthroplasty
Fatigue testing
Materials testing
Structural integrity
Polyurethanes
Acrylics
Reinforced concrete
Compaction
Actuators
Mechanical properties
Defects
Sensors
Composite materials

Keywords

  • Adjuvant screw fixation
  • Bone cement
  • Mechanical testing
  • Structural health monitoring
  • TKR
  • Total knee replacement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Computational Mechanics
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Keyser, R., Migliori, R., Morgan, T., Anton, S. R., Fariholt, K. M., & Meneghini, R. (2013). Mechanical strength of bone cement with and without adjuvant screw fixation. In Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series (Vol. 6, pp. 19-33) https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6546-1-3

Mechanical strength of bone cement with and without adjuvant screw fixation. / Keyser, Ryan; Migliori, Robert; Morgan, Tessa; Anton, Steven R.; Fariholt, Kevin M.; Meneghini, R.

Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series. Vol. 6 2013. p. 19-33.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Keyser, R, Migliori, R, Morgan, T, Anton, SR, Fariholt, KM & Meneghini, R 2013, Mechanical strength of bone cement with and without adjuvant screw fixation. in Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series. vol. 6, pp. 19-33, 31st International Modal Analysis Conference on Structural Dynamics, IMAC 2013, Garden Grove, CA, United States, 2/11/13. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6546-1-3
Keyser R, Migliori R, Morgan T, Anton SR, Fariholt KM, Meneghini R. Mechanical strength of bone cement with and without adjuvant screw fixation. In Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series. Vol. 6. 2013. p. 19-33 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6546-1-3
Keyser, Ryan ; Migliori, Robert ; Morgan, Tessa ; Anton, Steven R. ; Fariholt, Kevin M. ; Meneghini, R. / Mechanical strength of bone cement with and without adjuvant screw fixation. Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series. Vol. 6 2013. pp. 19-33
@inproceedings{9a9d6da436d64f4780a337aa3c6f869e,
title = "Mechanical strength of bone cement with and without adjuvant screw fixation",
abstract = "Knee replacement surgery is a challenging, invasive procedure, so it is prudent that reliable components are used to minimize the likelihood of implant failure and subsequent risky, post-operation corrections. Each artificial component is adhered to a bone interface by composite acrylic-based cement. It is theorized that the structural integrity and, by extension, longevity of bone cement used to fill voids in knee replacement surgery is augmented by adjuvant screws embedded in the cement and anchored in bone, analogous to rebar-reinforced concrete.While the screw fixation method has exhibited positive results in arthroplasty patients, no conclusive evidence has been produced demonstrating its value over cement without screw fixation. It was the purpose of this research to examine which, if either, method is more effective. Porous polyurethane blocks were used to emulate human bones, in which uniform defects were generated and filled with bone cement in two cases, with and without the addition of screws. To test their mechanical properties, the specimens were loaded in compression by a material testing machine to mimic the forces created by the body, with focus on micro-motion of the cement. Additionally, nondestructive damage detection techniques were performed during fatigue testing by high frequency interrogation using piezoceramic actuators and sensors. Damage detection and classification algorithms were explored from attained data.",
keywords = "Adjuvant screw fixation, Bone cement, Mechanical testing, Structural health monitoring, TKR, Total knee replacement",
author = "Ryan Keyser and Robert Migliori and Tessa Morgan and Anton, {Steven R.} and Fariholt, {Kevin M.} and R. Meneghini",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1007/978-1-4614-6546-1-3",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781461465454",
volume = "6",
pages = "19--33",
booktitle = "Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Mechanical strength of bone cement with and without adjuvant screw fixation

AU - Keyser, Ryan

AU - Migliori, Robert

AU - Morgan, Tessa

AU - Anton, Steven R.

AU - Fariholt, Kevin M.

AU - Meneghini, R.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Knee replacement surgery is a challenging, invasive procedure, so it is prudent that reliable components are used to minimize the likelihood of implant failure and subsequent risky, post-operation corrections. Each artificial component is adhered to a bone interface by composite acrylic-based cement. It is theorized that the structural integrity and, by extension, longevity of bone cement used to fill voids in knee replacement surgery is augmented by adjuvant screws embedded in the cement and anchored in bone, analogous to rebar-reinforced concrete.While the screw fixation method has exhibited positive results in arthroplasty patients, no conclusive evidence has been produced demonstrating its value over cement without screw fixation. It was the purpose of this research to examine which, if either, method is more effective. Porous polyurethane blocks were used to emulate human bones, in which uniform defects were generated and filled with bone cement in two cases, with and without the addition of screws. To test their mechanical properties, the specimens were loaded in compression by a material testing machine to mimic the forces created by the body, with focus on micro-motion of the cement. Additionally, nondestructive damage detection techniques were performed during fatigue testing by high frequency interrogation using piezoceramic actuators and sensors. Damage detection and classification algorithms were explored from attained data.

AB - Knee replacement surgery is a challenging, invasive procedure, so it is prudent that reliable components are used to minimize the likelihood of implant failure and subsequent risky, post-operation corrections. Each artificial component is adhered to a bone interface by composite acrylic-based cement. It is theorized that the structural integrity and, by extension, longevity of bone cement used to fill voids in knee replacement surgery is augmented by adjuvant screws embedded in the cement and anchored in bone, analogous to rebar-reinforced concrete.While the screw fixation method has exhibited positive results in arthroplasty patients, no conclusive evidence has been produced demonstrating its value over cement without screw fixation. It was the purpose of this research to examine which, if either, method is more effective. Porous polyurethane blocks were used to emulate human bones, in which uniform defects were generated and filled with bone cement in two cases, with and without the addition of screws. To test their mechanical properties, the specimens were loaded in compression by a material testing machine to mimic the forces created by the body, with focus on micro-motion of the cement. Additionally, nondestructive damage detection techniques were performed during fatigue testing by high frequency interrogation using piezoceramic actuators and sensors. Damage detection and classification algorithms were explored from attained data.

KW - Adjuvant screw fixation

KW - Bone cement

KW - Mechanical testing

KW - Structural health monitoring

KW - TKR

KW - Total knee replacement

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84889609216&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84889609216&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-1-4614-6546-1-3

DO - 10.1007/978-1-4614-6546-1-3

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:84889609216

SN - 9781461465454

VL - 6

SP - 19

EP - 33

BT - Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series

ER -