Mechanism of ammonium transport by intestinal segments following urinary diversion: Evidence for ionized NH4+ transport via K+-pathways

M. C. Hall, Michael Koch, W. S. McDougal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using a previously reported in vivo intestinal perfusion model in the rat, we have shown that net total ammonium absorption accounts for the majority of the acid load resulting from urinary intestinal diversion. In the present study, by varying perfusate pH and therefore NH3 concentrations, we demonstrated that the net flux of total ammonium did not correlate with non- ionized NH3 concentrations (r = .039). This indicates that the basic mechanism of total ammonium flux is via ionized NH4+ movement. To more precisely define the transport processes involved, we manipulated this system with the following chemical and pharmacologic probes of electrolyte transport: amiloride (0.5 mM/l.), furosemide (1 mM/l.), 2,4,6- triaminopyrimidine (TAP) (15 mM/l.), methylprednisilone (3 mg./100gm./B.W.) S.Q. x 3 days followed by perfusion, and barium (Ba2+) (15 mM/l.). Net solute flux was not significantly altered by the mucosal addition of amiloride or TAP. Methylprednisilone treated rats exhibited significantly diminished Na+ secretion (p <.01) and increased Cl- absorption (p + conductance channels and against significant NH4+ movement via this pathway. The mucosal addition of furosemide resulted in significantly decreased net absorption of both total ammonium (p + (p 2+ resulted in a three-fold reduction of ammonium absorption (p + absorption (p + transport pathways play a significant role in the intestinal transport of NH4+.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)453-457
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume148
Issue number2 I
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Urinary Diversion
Ammonium Compounds
Amiloride
Furosemide
Perfusion
Barium
Electrolytes
Acids

Keywords

  • ammonia
  • potassium
  • urinary diversion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Mechanism of ammonium transport by intestinal segments following urinary diversion : Evidence for ionized NH4+ transport via K+-pathways. / Hall, M. C.; Koch, Michael; McDougal, W. S.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 148, No. 2 I, 1992, p. 453-457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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