Mechanism of exercise-induced ocular hypotension

Bruce Martin, Alon Harris, Ted Hammel, Vic Malinovsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE. Although acute dynamic exercise reduces intraocular pressure (IOP), the factors that provoke this response remain ill-defined. To determine whether changes in colloid osmotic pressure (COP) cause the IOP changes during exercise, standardized exercise was performed after dehydration and hydration with isosmotic fluid. METHODS. Progressive cycle ergometer exercise to volitional exhaustion was performed after 4 hours' dehydration, and after hydration with 946 ml isosmotic liquid (345 mOsM). In each experiment, venous blood taken before and immediately after exercise was analyzed for hematocrit, plasma protein concentration, total plasma osmolality, and plasma COP. RESULTS. Exercise in both experiments significantly reduced IOP and elevated COP (each P < 0.01). Dehydration, compared with hydration, also significantly reduced IOP and elevated COP, when measured before and after exercise (P < 0.05). The correlation of mean IOP with mean COP, over the entire range created by varying exercise and hydration statuses, was statistically significant (r = -0.99; P < 0.001). In contrast, other indexes of hydration status, including hematocrit, total plasma osmolality, and plasma protein concentration, failed to change as IOP changed and failed to correlate with IOP, on either a group or individual basis, in conditions of varying levels of exercise and hydration. CONCLUSIONS. Acute dynamic exercise and isosmotic fluid ingestion each seem to change IOP through changes in COP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1011-1015
Number of pages5
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume40
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ocular Hypotension
Controlled Hypotension
Intraocular Pressure
Osmotic Pressure
Colloids
Dehydration
Hematocrit
Osmolar Concentration
Blood Proteins
Exercise
Eating

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Martin, B., Harris, A., Hammel, T., & Malinovsky, V. (1999). Mechanism of exercise-induced ocular hypotension. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 40(5), 1011-1015.

Mechanism of exercise-induced ocular hypotension. / Martin, Bruce; Harris, Alon; Hammel, Ted; Malinovsky, Vic.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 40, No. 5, 1999, p. 1011-1015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martin, B, Harris, A, Hammel, T & Malinovsky, V 1999, 'Mechanism of exercise-induced ocular hypotension', Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, vol. 40, no. 5, pp. 1011-1015.
Martin, Bruce ; Harris, Alon ; Hammel, Ted ; Malinovsky, Vic. / Mechanism of exercise-induced ocular hypotension. In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 1999 ; Vol. 40, No. 5. pp. 1011-1015.
@article{aecef12088c341b9ba1fae88b00eca53,
title = "Mechanism of exercise-induced ocular hypotension",
abstract = "PURPOSE. Although acute dynamic exercise reduces intraocular pressure (IOP), the factors that provoke this response remain ill-defined. To determine whether changes in colloid osmotic pressure (COP) cause the IOP changes during exercise, standardized exercise was performed after dehydration and hydration with isosmotic fluid. METHODS. Progressive cycle ergometer exercise to volitional exhaustion was performed after 4 hours' dehydration, and after hydration with 946 ml isosmotic liquid (345 mOsM). In each experiment, venous blood taken before and immediately after exercise was analyzed for hematocrit, plasma protein concentration, total plasma osmolality, and plasma COP. RESULTS. Exercise in both experiments significantly reduced IOP and elevated COP (each P < 0.01). Dehydration, compared with hydration, also significantly reduced IOP and elevated COP, when measured before and after exercise (P < 0.05). The correlation of mean IOP with mean COP, over the entire range created by varying exercise and hydration statuses, was statistically significant (r = -0.99; P < 0.001). In contrast, other indexes of hydration status, including hematocrit, total plasma osmolality, and plasma protein concentration, failed to change as IOP changed and failed to correlate with IOP, on either a group or individual basis, in conditions of varying levels of exercise and hydration. CONCLUSIONS. Acute dynamic exercise and isosmotic fluid ingestion each seem to change IOP through changes in COP.",
author = "Bruce Martin and Alon Harris and Ted Hammel and Vic Malinovsky",
year = "1999",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "1011--1015",
journal = "Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science",
issn = "0146-0404",
publisher = "Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mechanism of exercise-induced ocular hypotension

AU - Martin, Bruce

AU - Harris, Alon

AU - Hammel, Ted

AU - Malinovsky, Vic

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - PURPOSE. Although acute dynamic exercise reduces intraocular pressure (IOP), the factors that provoke this response remain ill-defined. To determine whether changes in colloid osmotic pressure (COP) cause the IOP changes during exercise, standardized exercise was performed after dehydration and hydration with isosmotic fluid. METHODS. Progressive cycle ergometer exercise to volitional exhaustion was performed after 4 hours' dehydration, and after hydration with 946 ml isosmotic liquid (345 mOsM). In each experiment, venous blood taken before and immediately after exercise was analyzed for hematocrit, plasma protein concentration, total plasma osmolality, and plasma COP. RESULTS. Exercise in both experiments significantly reduced IOP and elevated COP (each P < 0.01). Dehydration, compared with hydration, also significantly reduced IOP and elevated COP, when measured before and after exercise (P < 0.05). The correlation of mean IOP with mean COP, over the entire range created by varying exercise and hydration statuses, was statistically significant (r = -0.99; P < 0.001). In contrast, other indexes of hydration status, including hematocrit, total plasma osmolality, and plasma protein concentration, failed to change as IOP changed and failed to correlate with IOP, on either a group or individual basis, in conditions of varying levels of exercise and hydration. CONCLUSIONS. Acute dynamic exercise and isosmotic fluid ingestion each seem to change IOP through changes in COP.

AB - PURPOSE. Although acute dynamic exercise reduces intraocular pressure (IOP), the factors that provoke this response remain ill-defined. To determine whether changes in colloid osmotic pressure (COP) cause the IOP changes during exercise, standardized exercise was performed after dehydration and hydration with isosmotic fluid. METHODS. Progressive cycle ergometer exercise to volitional exhaustion was performed after 4 hours' dehydration, and after hydration with 946 ml isosmotic liquid (345 mOsM). In each experiment, venous blood taken before and immediately after exercise was analyzed for hematocrit, plasma protein concentration, total plasma osmolality, and plasma COP. RESULTS. Exercise in both experiments significantly reduced IOP and elevated COP (each P < 0.01). Dehydration, compared with hydration, also significantly reduced IOP and elevated COP, when measured before and after exercise (P < 0.05). The correlation of mean IOP with mean COP, over the entire range created by varying exercise and hydration statuses, was statistically significant (r = -0.99; P < 0.001). In contrast, other indexes of hydration status, including hematocrit, total plasma osmolality, and plasma protein concentration, failed to change as IOP changed and failed to correlate with IOP, on either a group or individual basis, in conditions of varying levels of exercise and hydration. CONCLUSIONS. Acute dynamic exercise and isosmotic fluid ingestion each seem to change IOP through changes in COP.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033063268&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033063268&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 10102302

AN - SCOPUS:0033063268

VL - 40

SP - 1011

EP - 1015

JO - Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science

JF - Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science

SN - 0146-0404

IS - 5

ER -