Media violence exposure and executive functioning in aggressive and control adolescents

William Kronenberger, Vincent Mathews, David Dunn, Yang Wang, Elisabeth A. Wood, Ann L. Giauque, Joelle J. Larsen, Mary E. Rembusch, Mark J. Lowe, Tie Qiang Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationship between media violence exposure and executive functioning was investigated in samples of adolescents with no psychiatric diagnosis or with a history of aggressive-disruptive behavior. Age-, gender-, and IQ-matched samples of adolescents who had no Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-fourth edition (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) diagnosis (N = 27) and of adolescents who had DSM-IV Disruptive Behavior Disorder diagnoses (N = 27) completed measures of media violence exposure and tests of executive functioning. Moderate to strong relationships were found between higher amounts of media violence exposure and deficits in self-report, parent-report, and laboratory-based measures of executive functioning. A significant diagnosis by media violence exposure interaction effect was found for Conners' Continuous Performance Test scores, such that the media violence exposure-executive functioning relationship was stronger for adolescents who had Disruptive Behavior Disorder diagnoses. Results indicate that media violence exposure is related to poorer executive functioning, and this relationship may be stronger for adolescents who have a history of aggressive-disruptive behavior.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)725-737
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology
Volume61
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005

Fingerprint

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
Mental Disorders
Self Report
Exposure to Violence
Media Violence
Problem Behavior
History
Performance Test
Interaction
Test Scores
Self-report
Diagnostics

Keywords

  • Executive functioning
  • Frontal lobe
  • Media violence
  • Television
  • Video games

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Media violence exposure and executive functioning in aggressive and control adolescents. / Kronenberger, William; Mathews, Vincent; Dunn, David; Wang, Yang; Wood, Elisabeth A.; Giauque, Ann L.; Larsen, Joelle J.; Rembusch, Mary E.; Lowe, Mark J.; Li, Tie Qiang.

In: Journal of Clinical Psychology, Vol. 61, No. 6, 06.2005, p. 725-737.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kronenberger, William ; Mathews, Vincent ; Dunn, David ; Wang, Yang ; Wood, Elisabeth A. ; Giauque, Ann L. ; Larsen, Joelle J. ; Rembusch, Mary E. ; Lowe, Mark J. ; Li, Tie Qiang. / Media violence exposure and executive functioning in aggressive and control adolescents. In: Journal of Clinical Psychology. 2005 ; Vol. 61, No. 6. pp. 725-737.
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