Medicaid Coverage and Continuity for Juvenile Justice–Involved Youth

Valerie R. Anderson, Fangqian Ouyang, Wanzhu Tu, Marc Rosenman, Sarah Wiehe, Matthew Aalsma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined Medicaid coverage and continuity for youth with varying levels of justice system involvement and the impact of a policy change allowing Medicaid suspension, rather than termination. Data for this study were collected using a retrospective cohort design using arrest records and Medicaid enrollment tables for 20,688 youth. Age, gender, race/ethnicity, and deepest level of justice system involvement all were associated with time to de-enrollment from Medicaid. Suspension was associated with a small improvement in Medicaid continuity for justice-involved youth. In addition, youth with deeper levels of justice system involvement had faster time to de-enrollment. This study highlights the importance of maximizing opportunities to keep youth enrolled, as gaps in coverage will likely affect juveniles’ access to physical, mental, and behavioral health care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Correctional Health Care
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Medicaid
Social Justice
Suspensions
Mental Health
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • juvenile justice
  • Medicaid
  • policy
  • public health
  • survival analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Community and Home Care
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Medicaid Coverage and Continuity for Juvenile Justice–Involved Youth. / Anderson, Valerie R.; Ouyang, Fangqian; Tu, Wanzhu; Rosenman, Marc; Wiehe, Sarah; Aalsma, Matthew.

In: Journal of Correctional Health Care, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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