Medical and psychosocial predictors of caregiver distress and perceived burden following traumatic brain injury

Lynne C. Davis, Angelle M. Sander, Margaret A. Struchen, Mark Sherer, Risa Nakase-Richardson, James F. Malec

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether caregivers' medical and psychiatric histories, coping style, and social support predict global distress and perceived burden. DESIGN: Correlational, cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 114 caregivers of persons with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury, assessed 1 year postinjury. MEASURES: Ratings of caregivers' medical and psychiatric history; Disability Rating Scale; Ways of Coping Questionnaire; Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support; Brief Symptom Inventory; and Modified Caregiver Appraisal Scale. RESULTS: Caregivers' medical and psychiatric histories predicted global distress, after accounting for education, sex, income, and relationship, as well as disability of the person with injury. Increased use of escape-avoidance as a coping strategy was related to increased distress. Perceived burden was predicted by disability in the person with injury, use of escape-avoidance, and perceived social support. CONCLUSIONS: Caregivers' preinjury functioning is more predictive of global distress, whereas the functioning of the person with injury is more predictive of injury-related burden. Caregivers' medical and psychiatric histories are important considerations when targeting interventions; global stress management strategies may be as important as assisting with injury-related issues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-154
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009

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Caregivers
Psychiatry
Social Support
Wounds and Injuries
Disabled Persons
Sex Education
Traumatic Brain Injury
Cohort Studies
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Caregiver distress
  • Caregivers
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Medical and psychosocial predictors of caregiver distress and perceived burden following traumatic brain injury. / Davis, Lynne C.; Sander, Angelle M.; Struchen, Margaret A.; Sherer, Mark; Nakase-Richardson, Risa; Malec, James F.

In: Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, Vol. 24, No. 3, 05.2009, p. 145-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davis, Lynne C. ; Sander, Angelle M. ; Struchen, Margaret A. ; Sherer, Mark ; Nakase-Richardson, Risa ; Malec, James F. / Medical and psychosocial predictors of caregiver distress and perceived burden following traumatic brain injury. In: Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. 2009 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 145-154.
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