Medical student contact with patients on a surgery clerkship: Is there a chance to learn?

Margaret L. Boehler, Cathy J. Schwind, Gary Dunnington, David A. Rogers, Roland Folse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Earlier studies of medical students on nonsurgical rotations have shown that clinical clerks usually first interact with their patients late in the clinical course. This would seem disadvantageous to the student's learning because they would have less opportunity to generate diagnoses or a management plan. STUDY DESIGN: A questionnaire designed to assess the nature of medical student-patient interactions in all potential clinical sites was administered to third year medical students during their surgical clerkship. Students received questionnaires each day to evaluate their clinical experiences from the previous day. RESULTS: The results from 311 student-patient encounters were collected and analyzed by clinical site as follows: outpatient clinics, outpatient surgery, inpatient surgery, day of surgery admission, inpatient consults, or emergency room consults. Students reported significantly more opportunities to elicit chief complaint, generate potential diagnosis, develop or suggest a management plan, and perform the initial examination when in the clinic setting. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, students were given relatively few opportunities to be the first to interact with any patient in any setting. They infrequently had an opportunity to independently generate a hypothesis or generate a management plan. Currently, the clinic offers the best opportunity for the student to complete these processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)539-542
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American College of Surgeons
Volume195
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Medical Students
Students
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Inpatients
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Hospital Emergency Service
Learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Medical student contact with patients on a surgery clerkship : Is there a chance to learn? / Boehler, Margaret L.; Schwind, Cathy J.; Dunnington, Gary; Rogers, David A.; Folse, Roland.

In: Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Vol. 195, No. 4, 01.10.2002, p. 539-542.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boehler, Margaret L. ; Schwind, Cathy J. ; Dunnington, Gary ; Rogers, David A. ; Folse, Roland. / Medical student contact with patients on a surgery clerkship : Is there a chance to learn?. In: Journal of the American College of Surgeons. 2002 ; Vol. 195, No. 4. pp. 539-542.
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