Medication-taking behaviours in chronic kidney disease with multiple chronic conditions: a meta-ethnographic synthesis of qualitative studies

Rebecca Ellis, Janet Welch

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims and objectives: To identify behaviours associated with taking medications and medication adherence reported in qualitative studies of adults with chronic kidney disease and coexisting multiple chronic conditions. Background: To inform medication adherence interventions, information is needed to clarify the nature of the relationships between behaviours that support medication-taking and medication adherence in multiple chronic conditions. Design: Meta-ethnographic review and synthesis. Methods: CINAHL Complete, MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases were searched. Five qualitative studies met the inclusion criteria. A meta-ethnographic approach was used for synthesis. Medication-taking behaviours were abstracted from study findings and synthesised according to the contexts in which they occur and interpreted within a new developing framework named the Medication-taking Across the Care Continuum and Adherence-related Outcomes. Results: Twenty categories of medication-taking behaviours occurred in three main contexts: (1) patient–provider clinical encounters, (2) pharmacy encounters and (3) day-to-day management. These behaviours are distinctly different, multilevel and interrelated. Together they represent a process occurring across a continuum. Conclusions: Future medication adherence research should consider using a multilevel ecological view of medication management. Clinical practice and policy development can benefit from further understanding socio-contextual behaviours that occur across the continuum. Nurses should have greater presence in chronic disease management and be positioned to support the day-to-day home management of patients' medications. Relevance to clinical practice: Healthcare professionals can partner with patients to elucidate how these behaviours are enacted across the care continuum and in day-to-day management to identify opportunities to intervene on specific behaviours and promote medication adherence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)586-598
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume26
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Fingerprint

Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Medication Adherence
Continuity of Patient Care
Professional Practice
Multiple Chronic Conditions
Policy Making
Disease Management
MEDLINE
Chronic Disease
Nurses
Databases
Delivery of Health Care
Research

Keywords

  • behaviour
  • chronic illness
  • comorbidity
  • compliance
  • medication adherence
  • medication management
  • self-management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Medication-taking behaviours in chronic kidney disease with multiple chronic conditions : a meta-ethnographic synthesis of qualitative studies. / Ellis, Rebecca; Welch, Janet.

In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, Vol. 26, No. 5-6, 01.03.2017, p. 586-598.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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