Merging health literacy with computer technology: Self-managing diet and fluid intake among adult hemodialysis patients

Janet Welch, Katie A. Siek, Kay H. Connelly, Kim S. Astroth, M. Sue McManus, Linda Scott, Seongkum Heo, Michael Kraus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The Dietary Intake Monitoring Application (DIMA) is an electronic dietary self-monitor developed for use on a personal digital assistant (PDA). This paper describes how computer, information, numerical, and visual literacy were considered in development of DIMA. Methods: An iterative, participatory design approach was used. Forty individuals receiving hemodialysis at an urban inner-city facility, primarily middle-aged and African American, were recruited. Results: Computer literacy was considered by assessing abilities to complete traditional/nontraditional PDA tasks. Information literacy was enhanced by including a Universal-Product-Code (UPC) scanner, picture icons for food with no UPC code, voice recorder, and culturally sensitive food icons. Numerical literacy was enhanced by designing DIMA to compute real-time totals that allowed individuals to see their consumption relative to their dietary prescription. Visual literacy was considered by designing the graphical interface to convey intake data over a 24-h period that could be accurately interpreted by patients. Pictorial icons for feedback graphs used objects understood by patients. Practice implications: Preliminary data indicate the application is extremely helpful for individuals as they self-monitor their intake. If desired, DIMA could also be used for dietary counseling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)192-198
Number of pages7
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume79
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

Fingerprint

Health Literacy
Handheld Computers
Renal Dialysis
Diet
Technology
Information Literacy
Computer Literacy
Food
Aptitude
African Americans
Prescriptions
Counseling
Literacy
cyhalothrin

Keywords

  • Health literacy
  • Hemodialysis
  • Informatics
  • Self-management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Merging health literacy with computer technology : Self-managing diet and fluid intake among adult hemodialysis patients. / Welch, Janet; Siek, Katie A.; Connelly, Kay H.; Astroth, Kim S.; McManus, M. Sue; Scott, Linda; Heo, Seongkum; Kraus, Michael.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 79, No. 2, 05.2010, p. 192-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Welch, J, Siek, KA, Connelly, KH, Astroth, KS, McManus, MS, Scott, L, Heo, S & Kraus, M 2010, 'Merging health literacy with computer technology: Self-managing diet and fluid intake among adult hemodialysis patients', Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 79, no. 2, pp. 192-198. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2009.08.016
Welch, Janet ; Siek, Katie A. ; Connelly, Kay H. ; Astroth, Kim S. ; McManus, M. Sue ; Scott, Linda ; Heo, Seongkum ; Kraus, Michael. / Merging health literacy with computer technology : Self-managing diet and fluid intake among adult hemodialysis patients. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2010 ; Vol. 79, No. 2. pp. 192-198.
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