Metacognitive deficits in schizophrenia

Presence and associations with psychosocial outcomes

Paul H. Lysaker, Jenifer Vohs, Kyle S. Minor, Leonor Irarrázaval, Bethany Leonhardt, Jay A. Hamm, Marina Kukla, Raffaele Popolo, Lauren Luther, Kelly D. Buck, Sara Wasmuth, Giancarlo Dimaggio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Early formulations of schizophrenia suggested that the disorder involves a loss of ability to form integrated ideas about oneself, others, and the world, resulting in reductions in complex goal-directed behaviors. Exploring this position, the current review describes evidence that persons with schizophrenia experience decrements in their ability to form complex ideas about themselves and to ultimately use that knowledge to respond to psychological and social challenges. Studies are detailed that find greater levels of these impairments, defined as metacognitive deficits, in persons with schizophrenia in both early and later phases of illness as compared with other clinical and community groups. Furthermore, studies linking metacognitive deficits with poorer psychosocial functioning and other variables closely linked to outcomes are summarized. Clinical implications are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)530-536
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nervous and Mental Disease
Volume203
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

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Schizophrenia
Aptitude
Psychology

Keywords

  • Metacognition
  • Negative symptoms
  • Recovery
  • Schizophrenia
  • Social cognition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Metacognitive deficits in schizophrenia : Presence and associations with psychosocial outcomes. / Lysaker, Paul H.; Vohs, Jenifer; Minor, Kyle S.; Irarrázaval, Leonor; Leonhardt, Bethany; Hamm, Jay A.; Kukla, Marina; Popolo, Raffaele; Luther, Lauren; Buck, Kelly D.; Wasmuth, Sara; Dimaggio, Giancarlo.

In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, Vol. 203, No. 7, 01.07.2015, p. 530-536.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lysaker, PH, Vohs, J, Minor, KS, Irarrázaval, L, Leonhardt, B, Hamm, JA, Kukla, M, Popolo, R, Luther, L, Buck, KD, Wasmuth, S & Dimaggio, G 2015, 'Metacognitive deficits in schizophrenia: Presence and associations with psychosocial outcomes', Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, vol. 203, no. 7, pp. 530-536. https://doi.org/10.1097/NMD.0000000000000323
Lysaker, Paul H. ; Vohs, Jenifer ; Minor, Kyle S. ; Irarrázaval, Leonor ; Leonhardt, Bethany ; Hamm, Jay A. ; Kukla, Marina ; Popolo, Raffaele ; Luther, Lauren ; Buck, Kelly D. ; Wasmuth, Sara ; Dimaggio, Giancarlo. / Metacognitive deficits in schizophrenia : Presence and associations with psychosocial outcomes. In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. 2015 ; Vol. 203, No. 7. pp. 530-536.
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