Metacognitive deficits predict future levels of negative symptoms in schizophrenia controlling for neurocognition, affect recognition, and self-expectation of goal attainment

Paul H. Lysaker, Marina Kukla, Julien Dubreucq, Andrew Gumley, Hamish McLeod, Jenifer L. Vohs, Kelly D. Buck, Kyle S. Minor, Lauren Luther, Bethany L. Leonhardt, Elizabeth A. Belanger, Raffaele Popolo, Giancarlo Dimaggio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

The recalcitrance of negative symptoms in the face of pharmacologic treatment has spurred interest in understanding the psychological factors that contribute to their formation and persistence. Accordingly, this study investigated whether deficits in metacognition, or the ability to form integrated ideas about oneself, others, and the world, prospectively predicted levels of negative symptoms independent of deficits in neurocognition, affect recognition and defeatist beliefs. Participants were 53 adults with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder. Prior to entry into a rehabilitation program, all participants completed concurrent assessments of metacognition with the Metacognitive Assessment Scale-Abbreviated, negative symptoms with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, neurocognition with the MATRICS battery, affect recognition with the Bell Lysaker Emotion Recognition Task, and one form of defeatist beliefs with the Recovery Assessment Scale. Negative symptoms were then reassessed one week, 9. weeks, and 17. weeks after entry into the program. A mixed effects regression model revealed that after controlling for baseline negative symptoms, a general index of neurocognition, defeatist beliefs and capacity for affect recognition, lower levels of metacognition predicted higher levels of negative symptoms across all subsequent time points. Poorer metacognition was able to predict later levels of elevated negative symptoms even after controlling for initial levels of negative symptoms. Results may suggest that metacognitive deficits are a risk factor for elevated levels of negative symptoms in the future. Clinical implications are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number6512
Pages (from-to)267-272
Number of pages6
JournalSchizophrenia Research
Volume168
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

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Keywords

  • Metacognition
  • Negative symptoms
  • Neurocognition
  • Recovery
  • Schizophrenia
  • Social cognition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Lysaker, P. H., Kukla, M., Dubreucq, J., Gumley, A., McLeod, H., Vohs, J. L., Buck, K. D., Minor, K. S., Luther, L., Leonhardt, B. L., Belanger, E. A., Popolo, R., & Dimaggio, G. (2015). Metacognitive deficits predict future levels of negative symptoms in schizophrenia controlling for neurocognition, affect recognition, and self-expectation of goal attainment. Schizophrenia Research, 168(1-2), 267-272. [6512]. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2015.06.015